Developer: Chillingo
Price: $0.99
Version: 1.0
App Reviewed on: iPhone 5

Graphics / Sound Rating: ★★★★½
User Interface Rating: ★★★★☆
Gameplay Rating: ★★★★☆
Re-use / Replay Value Rating: ★★★★☆

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

Protip: Try to stay on the gods’ good side. Seriously, those Olympians don’t mess around. The minute mankind starts to get a little uppity they start laying waste to half the planet. Of course it doesn’t help matters when puny humans attempt to rise up and overthrow them. That’s when things really start to get ugly.

Fury of the Gods puts players in the massive sandals of one of three mythological Greek gods: Zeus, Poseidon, and Hades. Each has their own mix of challenges to overcome, however the basic idea is to simply keep those pesky mortals away from the temple at the top of the mountain. Swiping the screen will adjust the view and rotate the camera while pinching adjusts the zoom. Then it’s a matter of laying waste to any intruders with a malevolent finger. Tapping the approaching forces repeatedly will crush them out of existence, but squishing alone won’t cut it. Players will also have to make use of their gods’ abilities or risk failure.

Fury of the Gods is a good looking game. The character models are a little on the simple side when viewed up close but the levels themselves look great, especially the lighting. There are also a few cool nuances to them such as being able to destroy a bridge and alter the humans’ routes. I was also impressed with how different the three gods are. Simply jumping from Zeus to Poseidon was significant as the water god has seafaring enemies in addition to the foot soldiers, as well as the ability to summon a vortex that doesn’t do a lot of damage but can severely slow the “bad guys” down for a bit.

The addition of defense units adds yet another layer of strategy to the manic tapping and makes Fury of the Gods feel a bit like a tower defense game. Again, different gods have different legendary creatures to make use of (except the Cyclops, they all have that guy), and each one has its uses. I’m particularly fond of placing a gryphon towards the beginning of a path as it damages enemies and poisons them. About the only problem I’ve run across is the occasional slip of the finger leading to a badly timed camera swing rather than a much needed summoning of a meteor. It can also be difficult to keep track of the puny humans from a distance, but that’s mostly due to the iPhone’s screen being tiny.

Fury of the Gods is tough at times, at least until learning the value of using abilities over straight tapping, but it’s more than enough fun to make up for it. The small stable of gods to play as still offer plenty of levels to enjoy and plenty of abilities to unlock and upgrade. Yessir, it’s good to be omnipotent.

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