Posts Tagged minecraft

Daniel Kaplan, Business Developer for Mojang, announced some pretty big news for Minecraft – Pocket Edition yesterday. The Pocket Edition team has begun to rework the game’s code in order to allow for the generation of worlds that are much larger than those that are currently (and kind of disappointingly) available.

More stuff is planned to roll out along with it of course, including updated inventory and AI systems, and it looks like wolves maybe? There’s no real indication of just how much bigger these new worlds will actually be, however it’s definitely promising news. As of now there’s no specific release date in sight, but it’s definitely something to keep an eye out for.

mcpe_wolf

source: Mojang

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Minecraft has been a full-blown phenomenon for quite some time now and it doesn’t look like that’s going to change anytime soon. Regardless of whether or not you’re a fan of the sandbox builder, it’s influence is undeniable. Lots of games have tried to replicate its success with varying degrees of success, but what’s interesting is just how different many of them turned out to be. Some are 2D, some are 3D. Some implement more structured gameplay like tower defense elements on top of all the user-defined construction mechanics. A few almost feel like a randomly generated Metroid. Heck, some even incorporate a ecent number of RPG elements.

Honestly, there’s been quite the creative crop of blocky sandbox games on iOS for a while now, and this year was no exception. So naturally we decided to put together a list of some of our favorites.

Minecraft – Pocket Edition

repl_minecraftMinecraft – Pocket Edition was actually a little late to its own party on iOS. When it first arrived it fell far short of expectations, but just like the PC original it’s been steadily improving ever since. What was once a simple 3D block placement exercise has been fleshed out to include enemies, crafting, fishing, and more. Of course since the PC version has continued to grow the iOS port still hasn’t managed to catch up, but it’s made some really incredible strides.

Junk Jack X

JunkJackX-6It would be easy to take a look at Junk Jack X and dismiss it as nothing more than a 2D Minecraft, but nope. It’s actually a very well-made 2D adventure with a heavy emphasis on crafting, exploring, and combat. This sequel of sorts also managed to add multiplayer, animals that can be raised, clothing, character customization options, and a whole heck of a lot more. There are numerous planets to explore (and actual incentive to explore in the first place), and your inventory is tied to your character as opposed to the world so you can bring all your stuff with you while you travel.

The Blockheads

TheBlockheads-16Initially I expected The Blockheads to be nothing more than a 2D Minecraft (see a pattern emerging?), but oh my goodness I could not have been more wrong. Instead of a rehash minus a dimension, we have an incredibly unique take on sandbox crafting. One that hits all the right world exploring and building notes, while also incorporating sim-like elements as players guide their little Blockheads around the environment. What’s even more awesome is that they’ll continue to perform queued up actions even while the game is turned off! So even if you can only drop into a game for a few minutes it’s still possible to get quite a bit of stuff done.

Terraria

Terraria-2Terraria was one of the first “It’s like Minecraft, but” games, and just like pretty much everything else on this list it’s definitely not that simple. It’s more of a massive randomly-generated adventure game. Complete with NPCs to buy items off of, rare loot drops, special bosses, dungeons, and more. And this iOS port is no slouch. Some concessions had to be made (because of the touch screen, of course), but it’s been adapted to the new platform quite well.

Growtopia

What’s interesting about Growtopia is that it’s designed to be an MMO of sorts, but with a crafting motif. Well, it’s actually “splicing” and not “crafting.” Players combine items to generate totally new ones, which are then grown from the ground. It’s a little weird and a little different, but you’ve got to admit it’s also pretty intriguing. Just be aware that, as it’s an online game, you’ll have to learn to live with the constant inclusion of other players.

Block Fortress

blocktower07I freaking love Block Fortress. It’s this compelling mix of random level generation, resource management, base-building, and wave defense that never fails to entertain. Materials earned from harvesting and fending off waves of enemies can be used to improve your arsenal and bolster your defenses, and there are quite a number of defensive options at your disposal in the first place so you’ll be busy for quite a while. The upgradable everything that players can tweak using resources saved up from their various playthroughs also sweeten the deal significantly.

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It’s easy to look at mobile and see it as a wasteland for content; particularly with all the casual, free-to-play games, and especially the ones that seem to de-emphasize actual gameplay in favor of stronger monetization. That’s only if you’re not paying attention. Serious, core games – some even free-to-play – had a great year on iOS.

Oceanhorn was hyped for a good reason: it was beautiful and ambitious. That ambition didn’t entirely pay off in my opinion, but for the game to have succeeded financially is a huge step forward for gaming on mobile.

Oceanhorn-3It also felt like the barriers between mobile and PC/console games started to blur a bit. Frozen Synapse, Mode 7′s highly acclaimed PC strategy game, landed on iPad at last. Limbo received an excellent port. Leviathan: Warships brought cross-platform online play – and the best trailer of the year. Space Hulk was not perfect, but it made for an exceptional transition.

But perhaps few did it as spectacularly as XCOM: Enemy Unknown. That game proved that it was possible to take a massive console and PC title – a fantastic modern take on one of the greatest strategy games of all time – and put it on mobile without losing any of the experience. Firaxis also absolutely stuck the landing with Sid Meier’s Ace Patrol and its Pacific Skies followup; original games that went to PC later.


Continue reading 148Apps 2013 wrAPP-Up – Why Core Gaming Had a Great Year on Mobile »

Latest Update for Minecraft – Pocket Edition Adds Improves the Look, Expands the View, and Adds Lots of New Stuff

Posted by on December 12th, 2013
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad

Remember when Minecraft – Pocket Edition first came out and people were disappointed because it paled so much in comparison to the PC version? Well those differences have been slowly disappearing over the past two years. In fact, this latest update (0.8.0) is purported to be the biggest one yet. And based on what I’m seeing in the notes, I’m inclined to agree!

What do you get when you update Minecraft – Pocket Edition this time? Not much; just mine carts, textures lifted from the PC version, new blocks like carpets and iron bars, more crops, several additions to Creative Mode, improved lighting, an increased view distance, and more. Check below for the update notes. Or, you know, just download it already.

mcpe_cart

What’s New in Version 0.8.0
- Minecarts, rails, and powered rails!
- The view distance has been massively increased. Check the options menu for more!
- New textures and colours taken directly from the PC version
- New blocks: carpets, more wood types, hay bales, iron bars, and more
- New crops and food types, including beetroot, carrots, potatoes and pumpkins. Now you can cook new soups, pies, and more!
- A bunch of new items for Creative and Survival, including clocks and compasses
- More blocks and items to use in Creative Mode: including jungle wood, ice, bedrock, shears, dyes, and tall grass
- New AI: mobs are now more intelligent and you can even breed your own animals
- A new Creative Mode inventory with tabs
- New functionality and tweaks to existing blocks and items. Bonemeal lets you grow new cool stuff!
- Improved lighting and fog effects
- Loads of bugs fixed, and possibly some added.

via: Our Review

The Blockheads Adds Electricity, Trains, Transportation, and a Whole Lot More in This New Update

Posted by on October 10th, 2013
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad

The expansive 2D Minecraft-like that is The Blockheads has just received another major update, bringing the list of features into the realm of the ridiculous.

In addition to all the expected (but still very much welcome) improvements, most of which involve multiplayer stuff like item ownership and player device banning, there have also been quite a few additions. Things like HD textures for newer devices, the ability to warp in up to 5 Blockheads, electric workbenches that are faster and use less fuel, new types of weapons and armors, a few new mysterious enemies, and trains to transport materials (and players) around the world. Seriously, that should be more than enough incentive to check The Blockheads out if you haven’t already.

blockh1blockh2

via: Our Review

Junk Jack X Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Junk Jack X succeeds as a crafting game thanks to a wealth of features, a beautiful look, and the fact that it's made for touch screen devices.

Read The Full Review »
Pixel Gun 3D Review

Pixel Gun 3D Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Minecraft with guns is great with friends or strangers, but like many things, is dull by yourself.

Read The Full Review »

Your App Experts

 

Need to know the latest and greatest apps each and every week? Look no further than 148Apps. Our reviewers comb through the vast numbers of new apps out there, find the good ones, and write about them in depth. The ones we love become Editor’s Choice, standing out above the many good apps and games with something just a little bit more to offer. Want to see what we’ve been up to this week? Take a look below for a sampling of our latest reviews. And if you want more, be sure to hit our Reviews Archive.

Solstice Arena

 
solsticearena12

League of Legends may not have invented the MOBA (Multiplayer Online Battle Arena) genre, but it certainly had a hand in popularizing it. It’s actually become so popular that there have been more than a few attempts at recreating such an experience on iOS. And I have to admit that while Solstice Arena has a few snags, it’s probably the best mobile iteration I’ve played yet. The basic gist of a MOBA is that two teams of players beef over turf until one has wiped out the others’ base. What makes things a little different than every other team-based multiplayer game out there is that the characters feel more like MMORPG classes than anything; each with specific skills that are meant to pair well with other characters’ and each with their own role to play. In Solstice Arena, players must take down the other team’s towers in order to weaken defenses, while simultaneously battling other player characters who are trying to do the same to them. There’s no major penalty for death except for waiting to respawn, although it’s a good opportunity to spend gold on better gear for the match. –Rob Rich

Avengers Alliance

 
avengersalliance10

For several months now I’ve been seeing little Facebook updates about friends and their Avengers Alliance progress. I had about gotten to the point where I was going to see what all the fuss was about when I found out it was coming to iOS, so naturally I decided to check out the more portable version instead. The Earth is in danger (again) from some sort of enigmatic presence. Also super villains. As a new S.H.I.E.L.D. recruit, players must team up with a host of notable Marvel heroes as they try to thwart nefarious plots and figure out just what in the heck is going on. The majority of these missions involve turn-based battles with various baddies, but it’s also possible to send characters off on side missions (over a set period of real time, of course) for extra cash and experience. Players can also train their heroes when they’ve acquired enough experience in order to access new abilities that can make a huge difference in a fight. –Rob Rich

Rando

 
rando

“You have no friends.” This is a tagline for Rando, a photo-sharing app from ustwo. Initially the statement seems hostile, but it reveals the philosophy behind this app: it’s anti-social. It’s not about status or appearance, like Instagram, the service that this app stands in marked contrast to. It’s all about sharing photos to someone, or no one in particular. See, how Rando works is that it lets users take a circular photo, and then launch it into the universe. It’s saved to the camera roll, but there’s no way to share that photo to any social networks from within the app itself. Later on, a push notification may be received that will say that someone in a certain spot will have received one of the user’s Randos, but that’s it. This is about sharing to just one person. One random person out there in the universe. They might like the photo, they might not, the photographer won’t know at all. –Carter Dotson

Other 148Apps Network Sites

 
If you are looking for the best reviews of kids’ apps and/or Android apps, just head right over to GiggleApps and AndroidRundown. Here are just some of the reviews these sites served up this week:

GiggleApps

 

Helping Me and Dad, and Just Grandpa and Me

 
just helping

Helping My Dad – Little Critter and Just Grandpa and Me – Little Critter are charming apps adapted from the storybooks of the same name, now developed by Oceanhouse Media – great choices for Father’s Day. In these tales, Little Critter tries hard to be helpful to his loved ones although he is unaware of the mess he makes in the wake of his helpfulness. In Helping My Dad, Little Critter tries his best to take care of his father, creating more work for him along the way as kids are known to do, such as waking him up early on dad’s day off or making breakfast, causing terrible disarray in the kitchen. –Amy Solomon

Sago Mini Forest Flyer

 
sago

Sago Mini Forest Flyer is a delightful, universal app from Sago Sago, a new developer to be aware of as it is a combination of talents from both Toca Boca as well as the creative minds who developed zinc Roe’s Tickle Tap Apps. As some readers may know, the Tickle Tap Apps are a series of apps that were my son’s first experience with applications, now having been re-developed into new apps. Sago Mini Forest Flyer is a new variation of the earlier app, Field Flyer. Sago Mini Forest Flyer maintains much of what we have enjoyed from Field Flyer as well as adding new elements to have fun with as well. –Amy Solomon

AndroidRundown

Block Story

 
block

Block Story is a quest-based adventure in the same vein as Minecraft that puts an adjusted spin on survival style gaming. Gameplay starts straight away: a mini-tutorial greets you with basics of the action. Players learn movement, collection of items, hunting and the procurement of sustenance, and more. The options give a good idea of what to expect; players get to name a new “world” and “world seed” and select from three modes: Story, Creative and Hardcore. Then you can pick or create a character and push on. –Tre Lawrence

Uno & Friends

 
uno

UNO & Friends is a re-polished take on the classic shedding-type card game that tosses in some interesting new features and multiplayer functionality. The standard gameplay applies. Play commences against three other players, each player being dealt seven shuffled and random cards from a deck of four colors (yellow, green, blue and red). The rest of the cards, face down for surprise chance effect, make up the deck and the topmost deck card is turned over and becomes the starter card. The first player then places a card that matches the color or rank of the starter card; each succeeding player then takes a turn in clockwise fashion, also trying to play a card that matches the last card played. If a player does not have a card to play can take it from the bank; if it is playable, it has to be played immediately. The first player to play all his/her cards wins. –Tre Lawrence

Tilt Arena

 
tilt

Tilt Arena is a classic type of game for a modern type of gamer. If the game brings back memories if the iconic arcade shooter Geometry Wars, don’t feel alarmed; that’s a good thing, and the developer isn’t ashamed of the potential mental connection. The gameplay is fairly simple; the goal is to stay alive. It’s set up in a rectangular grid, with the player in control of a white trapezoid spacecraft. Armed with perpetually shooting guns, I had to avoid the randomly appearing enemy spacecraft that were oh so eager to exhibit their contact-based lethality. Darting around and dodging them helped to a small degree, but directing the guns at them destroys them and earns valuable points. –Tre Lawrence

SurvivalCraft Review

SurvivalCraft Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
This open world sandbox crafting game with obvious inspirations doesn't win any awards for originality, but it still manages to incorporate features that are missing from the original.

Read The Full Review »

I think most people can agree that we probably don’t need quite as many first-person shooters on the market as we actually have. There are some great games to be had, sure, but with so much over-saturation it starts to become difficult to get excited about it. That’s why we’ve got a list of four of our favorite first-person games that aren’t shooters. They use the same perspective, and in some cases the same “floating hands” motif, but there are no firearms to be found. See? Just because a game is in first-person doesn’t mean it has to involve shooting stuff in the face.

fav4firstperson_darkmeadowDark Meadow
Okay, so technically you do shoot some stuff in the face here, but not in the traditional sense. That’s kind of a weird thing to say now that I think about it. Anyway the crossbow isn’t actually a gun, and it functions are more of a way to chip away at an enemy’s health before they close the gap. Dark Meadow is primarily a first-person adventure/action game with an emphasis on exploration and melee. A combination that ends up being pretty awesome.

$5.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-10-06 :: Category: Games

fav4firstperson_thequestThe Quest
Now The Quest is definitely not a shooter. It’s an old-school inspired, first-person, turn-based RPG that isn’t afraid to force those who write about it to use lots of hyphens. It’s also an incredibly robust adventure that allows players to create a number of various custom characters and tackle the world and its various quests as they see fit. And that’s all before taking the ridiculous amount of expansions into account.

$4.99
iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Released: 2009-02-20 :: Category: Games

fav4firstperson_ravenswordRavensword: Shadowlands
If you were to ask any console gamers about first-person games that aren’t shooters, one of the first titles that would pop into their head would have to be either Oblivion or Skyrim. This is the iOS gamer’s equivalent. Ravensword is a huge RPG full of little nooks and crannies to explore and unique creatures to slay. It can, of course, be played in third-person as well but in this instance first-person is far superior.

$6.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2012-12-20 :: Category: Games

fav4firstperson_minecraftMinecraft – Pocket Edition
Betcha didn’t see this one coming. Minecraft is a lot of things to different people: gaming’s most amazing sandbox, a great way to be creative with friends, The Second Coming, a boring and over-hyped piece of junk, or even just “meh.” But what isn’t debatable is the fact that it’s one of the least shooter-y first-person games currently available on iOS devices. Not only is there little to no emphasis on shooting (plus there’s only a bow), but it’s a game that’s actually about building rather than destroying. At least for those who wouldn’t jump into another player’s game just to troll.

$6.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-11-17 :: Category: Games

Polygon reports that Mojang, the developers of Minecraft, is looking to release a new monthly service plan this summer to enable a more simplified gameplay experience for Minecraft players. Minecraft Realms will allow fans to easily create a permanent, private world on a server and have complete control of who may join them in their world. Currently, fans need to know technical knowledge on how to set up and rent their own server in order to have their own private world, but soon they will be able to instantly have a server up and running with one simple click of a button, thanks to the simplified Realms monthly service.

Mojang plans to launch Minecraft Realms on their mobile edition of the game, Pocket Edition, and even more interestingly have discussed the possibility of designing a way for PC and Mobile versions of Realms to communicate with each other, though it would be a difficult undertaking. The other topic of discussion is to eventually add the ability for players to form a network of servers by connecting to each other to create an even more social experience.

source: Polygon

I love how, at the beginning of this video, developer Jim Rutherford says, “This is just a little weekend hacking project we through together.” How modest!

Rutherford’s son is ten, and loves Minecraft. Dad decided to mess around with a Phillips Vue lightbulb, and connect it to an app running on his iPad that then connects to the Minecraft server and changes color and brightness in sync with the Minecraft day/night cycle. The app lets them set the time of day, debug the cycle, and even scrub through it, assumedly issuing server commands to achieve the effects.

Not only is this super cool, and would make my own 10-year-old son squeal with joy, but Rutherford has put the code up on github, a repository of open source code that anyone can access. If you’re a hacker/developer, be sure to head on over there and grab the code.

via: Cult Of Mac source: YouTube
Block Fortress Review

Block Fortress Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Oh, Foursaken Media, will you ever release something that *isn't* great?

Read The Full Review »

Not all games can be winners, and not all the games we review on 148Apps will receive high marks. But the amazing thing about the App Store and mobile game development in general is that there’s always a second (or even a third) chance. Content updates allow developers to address complaints or perceived issues fairly quickly and have the potential to completely turn a game around.

Which is why we’ve decided to take a look at some previously reviewed titles that didn’t go over so well the first time. Each one has been tweaked at least once since we wrote about it and we wanted to see how they might hold up now. Have they been significantly improved or are they only marginally better? Were major issues resolved or are they still dragging the entire experience down?

Lets take a look and see, then.


Puzzle Planets


Original Review Score – 2.5
ReviewerBonnie Eisenman
Known Issues – Severe performance problems including lag and crashing, control issues due to said lag.
Updates – Performance greatly improved with no discernable lag and no crashing, also resulting in improved control.

I like weird stuff like Puzzle Planets, but even I found it to be tough to play, originally. Thankfully, the game-breaking problems that kept Bonnie from enjoying it at launch have been addressed. And it’s all the better for it.

In my time spent building several alien worlds, I’ve never once had it crash on me, and being able to enjoy an iOS game uninterrupted is pretty important. More than that, however, the lag also seems to have disappeared, which makes it much easier to simply enjoy the game itself. All the planet rotating, pinching to form mountains, reverse-pinching to create fissures, and tapping to create volcanoes, as well as spinning the planet around in order to soak up water and distribute it to the barren land masses to create life all perform smoothly and create a kind of zen-like trance after a few rounds. I’ll certainly admit that it would be nice to have more than 15 planets to mess around with, possibly with some distinct characteristics rather than everything looking like “Earth 2.0,” but that doesn’t keep the somewhat simple time-based puzzles from being fun (and looking great) while they last.

$0.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-03-18 :: Category: Games

Minecraft – Pocket Edition


Original Review Score – 2.5
ReviewerRob Thomas
Known Issues – Virtually none of the features that made the PC version so notable, a complete lack of survival mode, barely any blocks to play with, super-tiny worlds.
Updates – Survival Mode, crafting, armor, mobs, a lot more blocks.

Now this is a game I did check out as soon as it was released onto the App Store. And, just like Rob T. (yes, we have a lot of Robs here), I thought it was a colossal disappointment. Nothing but a simplified Creative Mode with an extremely limited block selection. To call it a mere shadow of its older brother on PC would be a massive understatement. However, Mojang made good on its promise of constant updates, and the game has seen a slew of improvements ever since.

To be fair, this still isn’t a 1:1, pocket-sized version of the PC game. Heck, it’s still technically alpha status at the moment. Even so, this month’s update has brought it much closer. New blocks have made it in, sand and gravel are finally affected by gravity, armor can be crafted now, baby animals will appear, and so on. As I’ve said, it’s not PC Minecraft on iOS, but it’s certainly close enough to make me happy. Heck, in some ways I actually prefer it to the original because I can play it anywhere at any time, and it utilizes a much friendlier crafting system that does away with tile placement and simply shows what can be made outright. If it weren’t for the absence of a few features I’d even call it the best version to own. Even so, it’s a fantastic companion to the indie juggernaut Notch started to build all those years ago.

$6.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-11-17 :: Category: Games

The Simpsons: Tapped Out


Original Review Score – 2.0
ReviewerBrad Hilderbrand
Known Issues – Absurdly long real time requirements for performing tasks, an almost unnecessary reliance on premium currency.
Updates – Improved server stability, special holiday events.

The Simpsons: Tapped Out is another game that I myself didn’t play around with until recently. It’s also a bit more complicated of a comparison than the other three games on this list in that virtually none of the issues mentioned in Brad’s review have been addressed. Instead, the real difference is having another perspective.

First I’d like to say that I 100% respect Brad’s opinion on the matter and can totally see where he’s coming from. This game takes time to play. Lots and lots of time. More so than the average freemium title, it seems. However, I don’t necessarily view that as a “bad” thing. The very nature of many free-to-play games makes them ideal for playing in small increments, and that’s no different here. Sure we have to wait 24 hours while Lisa does all of her homework for the week but when factoring in all the other characters that can be acquired and given tasks to complete it doesn’t seem so bad. I’d consider it ideal, actually, since it means I can fiddle with my own personal Springfield, go off and do whatever my day demands, then check back in on occasion. I can’t claim that the game has been “improved” at all in the past year, but I don’t personally think it really needed to be. It’s Springfield in my pocket, and that’s exactly what I was hoping for.

FREE!
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2012-03-01 :: Category: Games

Static Quest: The Delivery


Original Review Score – 2.5
ReviewerRay Willmott
Known Issues – Lackluster freemium mechanics that practically force players to pay in order to progress, overly simple gameplay, no staying power.
Updates – Bug fixes for late-game content.

Based on what I’ve read in Ray’s review, I’m willing to chalk this one up to a fairly drastic difference of opinion. Again, I wholly respect Ray’s views and opinions but mine are almost a complete 180 from his.

It’s true that Static Quest: The Delivery is incredibly basic in its “tap either side of the screen” mechanics. However those same mechanics are what make it ideal for quick mobile play sessions. It’s super easy to start up a game for a minute then put it down just as quickly, and with all the various weapons to unlock and upgrade there’s always something to strive for. I’m also rather fond of the retro pixel visuals (as per usual) but I found the special costumes associated with each weapon to be the real treat. I can totally get behind a game that makes the main character look like Ezio from Assassin’s Creed 2 (and up) when he uses a dagger, or like Robin Hood when he equips a bow and arrow. The fact that it’s actually quite fun to play doesn’t hurt, either.

$0.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2012-06-28 :: Category: Games

CraftedBattle Review

CraftedBattle Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
The foundations are there, but plenty more work needs to be done on this mix of Minecraft and FPS elements.

Read The Full Review »

Bring Interactive Creations To Life With Minecraft Papercraft Studio

Posted by on February 18th, 2013
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad

Designed by 57Digital, the same team behind 2011′s Minecraft Explorer, Minecraft Papercraft Studio is the key to rendering Minecraft digital avatars in the third dimension, via paper. Using this new app, you can print out diagrams to bring the characters to life with only a pair of scissors and some glue.

Dig This: Minecraft – Pocket Edition Gets Baby Animals In New Update

Posted by on January 31st, 2013
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad

Universal app, Minecraft – Pocket Edition, got a new update today, bringing new crafting joy to the diminutive version of one of the most popular games on any platform, including baby animals, signs, armor, fancy clouds, and more. If you haven’t grabbed it already, head over to the App Store now and do so, because baby animals!

Version 0.6.0
- Baby animals
- Signs
- Armor
- Fancy Clouds
- Sand and gravel have gravity
- Improved D-pad
- Lots of new blocks

Known bugs (fixed for next version)
- Falling sand can disappear
- When returning from Home-screen, sign model disappear
- Screenshots in store are old. Will put up new ones :)

Image: 6Minecraft

source: Our Review
Growtopia Review

Growtopia Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Growtopia takes the now-familiar mining and crafting genre, and turns it into a massively multiplayer grow-your-own-stuff game that unfortunately allows for, and maybe even encourages, griefing and scamming.

Read The Full Review »

Jean-Philippe Sarda’s Micro Miners, releasing on Thursday November 15th, is a game with an interesting origin and history on its way to the App Store.

The game has its inspirations in a Java game called Miners4K made by Markus Persson, better known as Notch of Minecraft fame, back in 2006. Notch and Sarda have been in touch before: after the game was created for the Java4K competition, Sarda says he “contacted Notch to get authorization to modify Miners4K with [the] pepere.org scores system…this game has made more than 1.3M plays on pepere.org until today.”

So how did Sarda’s take on the concept come about? He says “when I started developing iOS games in 2009, I still had this game/concept in a corner of my mind as I knew it was really special and so suited for touch devices.” However, this is not a case of unauthorized cloning: he got in touch with Notch to receive his blessing to build out the game. Sarda says “From the beginning I tried to contact Notch by email to get his authorization…Notch was busy with Minecraft and he ignored my 3 emails among thousands of emails he receives every week. Until I sent a link to the gameplay video, he replied ‘Haha, that looks cool! :D’ and tweeted the video. Don’t need to say how happy I was to receive this email.” The project, almost two years after its initial prototype, finally had its official blessing.

However, the game might not have ever made it to the App Store. As Sarda explains: “After 10 days [of] waiting, the game was rejected for low res graphics…I had 3 choices: 1) do another game as Micro Miners’ engine and art is entirely based on pixels 2) Resubmit the game hoping it’s reviewed [by] a smarter guy 3) Request a second review by the appeal board.” The game does have a lo-fi pixel art style, but we’ve all seen one too many crude fart apps for such an excuse to hold water. Also, see the Pokemon Yellow fiasco.

So what did Sarda do? He says “I selected 3) and I waited another 15 days, before I received their response ‘This app version has been approved. All communication regarding your previously-rejected binary is now closed.’ This is short but that was enough to make me happy.” The game’s fate was saved from seeming oblivion, and the release was scheduled for November 15th.

This game is not meant to be just a port of Miners4K, though. Sarda says “Yes it’s inspired by Miners4K for the ”Lemmings+Dig“ idea, but the gameplay is totally different and new, and it took me forever (and 5 beta tests) to tweak/adjust it.” And he has questions about how players will take to it: “…my games are usually really hard to play and appeal most to harcord players. I made a huge effort trying not to discourage casual players…the whole game is guided by contextual help.”

Micro Miners releases on November 15th and we’ll have a review of the game. For Sarda, however, the long journey will finally come to an end, as the world will finally get to check Micro Miners out for themselves.

The tower defense and castle defense genres are quite popular on iOS. Touch devices work perfectly for that type of game and, as a result, it’s hard for a new defense game to distinguish itself from the others. Battles and Castles has just been released and seems to have some interesting features that sets it apart.

The game seems to combine elements of traditional tower/castle defense games with building elements (that have become recently popular with games like Minecraft) and RPG elements. Users actually build their castles before defending them and then recruit units, find treasure, and explore mines. It seems to have elements that fans of nearly any genre can enjoy: strategy, simulation, action, and role-playing. The game has over 20 units and 20 buildings, three levels of technology, two campaign modes, multiplayer vs AI, local multiplayer on the device itself, and Game Center support.

Battles and Castles is a universal app and is available for $2.99.

$2.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2012-06-28 :: Category: Games

We loved Junk Jack at the end of last year. Its rather cute take on the Minecraft formula ensured its place in many gamers’ hearts. That’s how much fun it was.

As Rob greedily but understandably stated, it could have done with “more stuff to mess around” with. Fortunately, developers Pixbits has acknowledged this with a new and huge update that has just been released.

The update is big enough that we haven’t got the room to discuss every single improvement. However, key points to take in are that it’s now an Universal build, has new rare weapon drops and new mobs in the form of Stone Golems, Mummy Pharaohs, Carnivore Plants, Blue Scarabs, Frogs, Headless Zombies and Zombie Head.

That’s not all, though, with the addition of new color dyes, new recipes and a cooking pot and cooking ware craftable addon, also included. Farming fans can enjoy the option of plantable fruit, vegetables and trees, also.

It’s a huge update for Junk Jack and that’s not including the huge number of enhancements and fixes that come included. Without further ado, get downloading Junk Jack and watch your productivity and free time vanish!

$2.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-11-07 :: Category: Games

Image via Cult of Mac.

Minecraft may be my favorite game of all time. I’ve played it on an almost daily basis since I was introduced to it a little over a year ago. I remember how excited I got when the piston update came out. So imagine my disappointment when Minecraft – Pocket Edition was released for iOS with a fraction of the features in the PC version of the game. Finally, developer Mojang’s most recent update to Minecraft – Pocket Edition has taken one step closer to making the iOS edition similar to the full edition with crafting.

Previously, one of the most important features of Minecraft, the ability to craft objects from material found in the game, was left out of Minecraft – Pocket Edition. Mojang has a tradition for taking game development slowly. It took the original Minecraft over a year of a completely playable beta for them to release what they called the 1.0 release. So it was no surprise that they planned to do the same with Minecraft – Pocket Edition. Crafting is part of Minecraft – Pocket Edition’s 0.3.0 update. Notice that they aren’t even calling Minecraft – Pocket Edition a 1.0 game yet. So in a way, Minecraft – Pocket Edition is still a beta.

Other features in the update include cows and chickens, damageable items, making resources harder to gather, and dropping items. I won’t be a true fan of the iOS version of Minecraft until it’s at par with the PC version and let’s me connect to multiplayer servers. But this update is a good start.

$6.99
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Released: 2011-11-17 :: Category: Games

Eden-World Builder Review

Eden-World Builder Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Eden-World Builder is an app that lets players do and build whatever they want. There are no goals or objectives in the game, just a wide-open world waiting for players to make whatever they can imagine.

Read The Full Review »

Microcraft is something of an oddity. It’s a fan-made “remake” of a port of a Notch-made knockoff of one of the most popular indie games of all time. Wow, that was intense.

The game itself functions much like a top-down Minecraft, with a few other key differences. While surviving assaults by vicious monsters and crafting items from wood and stone are still a major factor, there’s not much in the way of building. So while players can (and should) explore the world and create helpful tools and weapons for themselves, they can’t construct a fortress to live in. Kind of a shame, but making something like that from this perspective would undoubtedly be tough to pull off.

With several “mobs” to fight, a number of different environments to explore and a day/night cycle (not to mention all the crafting), I think Microcraft should make for a good time. Whether or not it stays on the App Store for very long is up in the air at this point since it does share many a similarity to Mojang’s runaway train of a game, as well as Notch’s Ludum Dare spin-off, but I’d like to think that it’s different enough to earn a permanent place among the other hundreds of thousands of titles up there.

$0.99
iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Released: 2012-01-30 :: Category: Games

Minecraft – Pocket Edition Review

Minecraft – Pocket Edition Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
The PC open-world construction hit comes to iOS with Minecraft - Pocket Edition. However, don't expect any Creepers or... you know, mining at the moment.

Read The Full Review »

For those living underneath a rock the past year or two, Minecraft is the uber popular indie-made computer game, for Mac and PC, that has set the gaming world on its ear while making a kajillion dollars – all while still in beta. The official non-beta version will most likely be announced this weekend at MineCon, but the big news for us here at 148Apps is the arrival tomorrow of Minecraft: Pocket Edition, also known as the end of productivity as we know it.

This pocket edition is reported to be the same as the Android version, and has also been out on the Xperia Play. The pocket version gives players all the needed blocks to craft and build and mine to their heart’s content, but does not include the survival mode made popular by the original game’s release. Other reports suggest that there will be a local multiplayer option that will allow iOS and Android users to play together.

All this is confirmed with the magic New Zealand iTunes store, which is listing the Universal app of Minecraft: Pocket Edition for iOS for about $7. Here in the US, the app should go live at midnight tomorrow. Or tonight. Whichever way you prefer to look at it.

Via GamePro

Junk Jack Review

Junk Jack Review

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Junk Jack is another sandbox game with rather obvious "inspirations," but to simplify it as such would be doing the game (and fans of this somewhat new-ish genre) a HUGE disservice.

Read The Full Review »
Crafted Review

Crafted Review

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Its inspirations are more than blatantly obvious, but that doesn't mean Crafted should be written-off.

Read The Full Review »
TerraCraft Review

TerraCraft Review

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
This Minecraft inspired matching game has players building items and constructing their way from level to level.

Read The Full Review »
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