Developer: Double Fine Productions
Price: FREE
Version Reviewed: 1.0.2
Device Reviewed On: iPhone 5

Graphics / Sound Rating: ★★★★☆
Gameplay Rating: ★★★★☆
Playtime Rating: ★★★★½
Replay Value Rating: ★★★★☆

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

I’m pretty tired today. I didn’t sleep well last night and it’s left me groggy headed. Want to know why I slept so badly? Because I was busy playing Middle Manager of Justice, instead of sleeping. It might be a fairly shallow if humorous game, but Double Fine’s latest release still manages to be very gripping to all but the most stoic of gamers.

Middle management is far from the most exciting of occupations but Middle Manager of Justice finds a way of making it interesting. Mostly, because players are managing the careers of superheroes in their bid to rid the world of evil megalomaniacs.

Players have to hire and train such superheroes, building up their abilities so that they can defeat the increasingly tough opposition. There’s a fair amount of grinding to it but it’s a relatively brief trial. Keeping the heroes busy is important and, fortunately, there’s always something new that they can do. The game is split into two parts: the superhero base and general maintenance side of things, and the combat arena. The heroes must keep fit and active by sleeping off old injuries back at the base, as well as working out at the gym to build up their powers.

Later sections of the game make it possible to buy new rooms, such as laboratories to develop new talents as well as a telesales department to raise extra funds. After all, running a superhero business isn’t cheap. Throughout, there’s a very tongue in cheek sense of humor and Middle Manager of Justice never takes itself too seriously. This shines through particularly when dealing with the bosses of the game’s regions, accessible after defeating a certain number of thugs and goons.

The combat side of things is a little basic, leaving players to either delegate or watch the fight themselves. It’s possible to initiate special attacks but, otherwise, it’s just a matter of waiting and seeing what happens. A percentage bar before the fight suggests the possibility of success. I found I was much more likely to succeed if I took an active role in the battle, rather than delegated. It’s faster too, given that delegation requires an one minute wait to complete the battle.

These brief waits are relatively commonplace throughout Middle Manager of Justice, given its freemium nature. The waits aren’t particularly long but they do make one slightly tempted to use real money to skip ahead or boost a superhero’s abilities. For the more frugal gamer, though, there is plenty of content to enjoy without spending money.

Middle Manager of Justice is a shallow affair. One that shouldn’t be as much fun as it actually is. Fortunately, it is fun and very addictive. After a time, players might find themselves repeating their actions but, ultimately, they won’t care.


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