Posts Tagged book

Dracula HD on iPad Review

Dracula HD on iPad Review

iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
A haunted tale of stately and vampiric proportions, told with atmospheric music and interactive style.

Read The Full Review »
The Pedlar Lady for iPad Review

The Pedlar Lady for iPad Review

iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
It's not particularly interactive, but Moving Tales' Pedlar Lady makes up for that with a compelling graphic and auditory style.

Read The Full Review »
One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish Review

One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish Review

Dr. Seuss book, rhyming, beautifully scaled to iPhone, can pan around the page, tap on images to see identifying words

Read The Full Review »

Most people who have seen my new iPad react with the same question, “should I get this or the Kindle?” Apple, obviously, intended its iPad to be perceived as much more than an eBook reader. Yet the much publicized launch of the iBookstore, along with the iPad’s slim form factor, have led many consumers to perceive the iPad as an expensive eBook reader.

The Kindle is the Premier eBook Reader

Amazon's Kindle 2

The Kindle was launched solely as an eBook reader and is marketed as such. Jeff Bezos, on introducing the device, said of the Kindle that “it’s so ambitious to take something as highly evolved as the book and improve on it. And maybe even change the way people read.” Amazon has definitely done much of the legwork in improving the acceptability of the eBook as a new medium for written material. Amazon’s true innovation was bringing E-Ink technology to the consumer market, along with doing the technical legwork to simplify the reading experience. At its core, the Kindle is a delivery device – a user purchases a book as they would online and finds it available for reading seconds later.

The reading experience does everything it can to mimic the experience of paper, all of which is aided by E-Ink. The screen is technology’s response to those who complained that they would never be able to read a book on a traditional LCD screen or a laptop. The Kindle itself is merely the size of a large paperback and is lighter than most printed books. The Kindle is Bezos’ effort to translate the book for the digital age, and he has largely succeeded in providing a popular and widely accepted new platform.

The iPad as an eBook Reader

Apple's iPad with iBooks

The iPad has benefited from terrific interest from both book publishers and book retailers. As a consequence we’ve seen innovative new packages like the Vook and traditional books from retailers like B&N, Amazon, and more. While the Kindle has a terrific – and probably the largest – bookstore, the iPad offers more choices for where you get your ebooks.

There’s Apple’s iBooks, Amazon’s Kindle reading app, B&N’s new iPad reader, and more. The three largest players each offer different solutions to the eBook problem. iBooks tries to mimic the feel of a physical book, utilizing a color UI with beautifully rendered page turns. The Kindle’s UI is black and white and encourages the same type of user interaction as the physical Kindle – a simple tap on the side of the screen changes pages in a fluid transition not as visually distracting as that of iBooks. B&N’s app allows users to choose from dozens of different visual settings but maintains the same fluid page transitions as Amazon’s Kindle app. Only the iBooks app has a store in-app; the others force the reader to go to Safari to purchase books. This is a definite snag in the clear workflow Bezos presented with the original Kindle, but one that I’m sure both B&N and Amazon will surmount in future applications.

The iPad’s reflective LCD screen probably isn’t the best for simply reading a book. It’s a pain in the sun, where it’s nearly impossible to see the text on a page. E-Ink mainly solves this problem with its screen. People who have issues reading for long periods of time on their laptops may wish to reconsider an iPad purchase if it’s intended solely as an eBook reader. While the reading experience is cleaner and more enjoyable, it’s the same experience as the backlit screens most notebooks include. In addition, the iPad’s battery life is rated at 10 hours, enough for most commuters but nowhere near the weeks the Kindle can last for.

The iPad as a Platform: Bigger Than Books

A Vook on the iPad

The key differentiator between the two comes when we move beyond the simple eBook reading features. The Kindle includes a browser, but not one that functions nearly as well as the iPad’s. It’s black and white and renders incredibly slowly due to the E-Ink screen technology. The iPad’s Safari browser is widely regarded as one of the best on a mobile platform.

I’ve always seen the iPad as more than a traditional book reader as well. The Kindle simply translates the book reading experience into the digital age but strives not to completely alter the way we experience books. New features like Amazon’s Popular Highlights add subtle suggestions about the importance of a passage but do not redefine the reading workflow. Cool ideas like the aforementioned Vook change the reading experience by adding videos, multimedia, more information about certain topics (with links) and more. Could the iPad help the form of the written word change? Only time, and developers, will tell.

Decisions, Decisions
Those of you struggling with the decision to purchase an iPad or a Kindle might want to do some soul searching. What do you want from your portable device? Just books and nothing more? Buy a Kindle – that’s what it’s meant for. But if you’re looking for a small computer, with thousands of different and innovative new applications that could redefine reading, the iPad is for you.

Beyond the unusual name, Mongoliad is an exciting new project that could play a part in changing the landscape for modern-day literature and the way it’s published. While everybody is busy talking about how the iPad could revolutionize the magazine market, this new serial novel collaboration is breaking new ground for both writers and consumers of traditional books.

Looking beyond the simple eBook reader mentality, Mongoliad harnesses the writing skills of Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear and others who will all contribute to the developing narrative. While a traditional story exists, Mongoliad’s aim is to create a world of interactivity between writers, readers and other non-literary members who can contribute to and enhance the story.
Mongoliad is due for launch this year and will be available on the iPhone and iPad.

Demoing just a few of Mongoliad’s promised features, Jeremy Bornstein of Subutai told us: “We think that devices like this really change publishing in a pretty fundamental way. Not just moving books into eBooks but really allowing for a lot more creative possibilities for engaging audiences”.

Set in around 1241 with the Mongol hoards threatening to destroy Europe, the novel will pull from a number of sources to ensure authenticity and from what we’ve heard so far, this includes experts in sword fighting to provide a healthy dose of swashbuckling knowledge.

The ins and outs of Mongoliad are still sketchy right now but we’re excited to see how the project progresses and, with such big names on board, how many others attempt to produce their own “novel within an app within an online service”. Most will likely be waiting to see the kind of buzz Mongoliad generates before taking the plunge but, from what we’ve seen so far, it’ll only be a matter of time.

[ as seen at the SF App Show ]

QuickReader

QuickReader

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
QuickReader is a speed-reading tool that can produce remarkable results. I was shocked by the rate at which my speed improved. Your mileage may vary, but if you're a frequent reader you owe it to yourself to give this one a go.

Read The Full Review »
B&N eReader

B&N eReader

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
The B&N eReader is a fantastic piece of software that is far superior to Amazon's Kindle for iPhone app. But without a killer piece of e-ink hardware, B&N's app might not be widely adopted...yet. Regardless, I'm ecstatic that there's a new player in the ebook field, especially since this is the best eReader app I've seen so far!

Read The Full Review »
MRM Comics: Love is in the Bag Vol.1 Issue 1

MRM Comics: Love is in the Bag Vol.1 Issue 1

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
A beautifully drawn Manga comic for your device. The graphics are stunning and a comic could make a nice gift idea for the geek in your life. [me! me!]

Read The Full Review »
WordDigest English Dictionary

WordDigest English Dictionary

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
WordDigest is a dictionary app with a huge database and a number of useful features, including bookmarking, browsing history, a thesaurus, and more. If you're looking for a solid dictionary, this is one to consider.

Read The Full Review »
Kindle for iPhone

Kindle for iPhone

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
While not the most robust ebook reader around, Amazon has just laid down the gauntlet in the iPhone / iPod Touch ebook war. Get instant access to over 240,000 books, even ones you've previously purchased for your Kindle!

Read The Full Review »
Next Read

Next Read

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Next Read helps you to keep track of books that others have suggested for you—suggestions that might otherwise be lost. Literature lovers will find Next Read to be a useful way to organize suggestions; others should probably pass.

Read The Full Review »
Wheels on the Bus

Wheels on the Bus

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
This application is a singing book designed to entertain a young child. However, it is much more than that. It has multiple languages, instruments and recording support, turning it into a great educational tool.

Read The Full Review »
iPhone: The Missing Manual

iPhone: The Missing Manual

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
iPhone - The Missing Manual is a Stanza ereader based book that thoroughly explains every feature of the iPhone, from its cell phone features to its iPod features, and its vast array of apps, those built-in and available from the iTunes app store. It covers the 3G version of the hardware but also makes references to the first gen version.

Read The Full Review »
Stanza

Stanza

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Stanza is one of the preeminent ebook readers on the iPhone / iPod Touch, with an intuitive interface, support for a wide variety of ebook formats, and an online store.

Read The Full Review »
eReader Pro

eReader Pro

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
eReader is a electronic book reader for the iPhone and iPod Touch. While there are other alternatives, some free and some not, eReader works well, is reliable, and makes reading a joy on the iPhone and iPod Touch.

Read The Full Review »
Classics

Classics

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Classics is a collection of 13 classic novels presented with a fantastic user interface

Read The Full Review »
    Advertisement    





Featured Apps

    Advertisement    


Categories

Developers

Would you like your application reviewed on 148Apps? See the About page for information.
    Advertisement    



Steel Media Network

148Apps - iPhone app reviews and news. The best gosh darn iPhone app site this side of Mars.
http://148apps.com :: @148Apps

Android Rundown - Android news and reviews. Where you get the rundown on Android apps and hardware.
http://AndroidRundown.com :: @AndroidRundown

Best App Ever - Yearly Mobile App Achievement Awards.
http://bestappever.com :: @BestAppEver

Pocket Gamer - Mobile game reviews, news, and features.
http://PocketGamer.co.uk :: @PocketGamer

Pocket Gamer.biz - Mobile games industry news, opinion, and analysis.
http://PocketGamer.biz :: @pgbiz

AppSpy - iOS game news and video reviews.
http://appspy.com :: @appspy