In case you missed it, I am on a quest to rank every Apple Arcade game there is.

Patch Notes:

Patch notes have been removed and have been replaced with (NEW) designation for the games most recently added or updated on this list.

UPDATE:As the pace of Apple Arcade has slowed, old games will also be re-evaluated based on reader feedback and content updates. Recently re-evaluated titles will be designated with (UPDATE) next to the title name.

Game ranking updates for 11/10:

Games marked with an asterisk(*) are games that suffer in rank due to technical problems.

All current rankings are listed below. More titles will be added frequently until the list is complete.



1. Card of Darkness

Description:

Zach Gage has been making great mobile games for a while now, and Card of Darkness is one of his best yet. It’s a card-based puzzle game where you fight through dungeons by picking up piles cards to create a path to an exit. Each pile of cards can contain weapons, enemies, potions, or spells, and you have to be careful about the order in which you pick up cards if you want to survive.

Rank Explanation:

Card of Darkness has all of the hallmarks of a fantastic mobile game. It’s a simple, creative concept placed in a hyper-polished and convenient package that you can enjoy for minutes or hours at a time. It also helps that every level seems to contain some new card that completely changes how you want to approach dungeons.

Card of Darkness beats out just about everything else because it’s the most original and mobile-friendly game on Apple Arcade. There may be other card games out there, but none are as colorful, quirky, and challenging as Card of Darkness.


2. Guildlings

Description:

Guildlings is a colorful rpg from the folks that made Threes! way back when. You play as Coda, a young girl who comes across an ancient phone with magical powers that turns you into a Guildmaster. As Guildmaster, you enlist the help of your friends to help you go on quests while you’re stuck in a magical bubble. What ensues is a series of charming adventures that consist of things like getting your sister to her date at "Makeout Temple" and gathering clams for your buddy Chazazz to give his grandma for a clam boil.

Rank Explanation:

I don’t think I’ve played an rpg that feels so perfect for mobile before. Not only does Guildlings play beautifully in a convenient portrait mode, but it also manages to feel like a grand adventure in the way lots of other mobile rpgs don’t. On top of this, Guildings is loaded with ground-breaking systems that make it feel unlike any game I’ve ever played. Everything about it feels like a warm hug, thanks mostly to the game’s focus on interpersonal relationships, plus its ultra charming visuals and writing. I just can’t say enough about Guildings. It’s certainly a must play.


3. A Monster's Expedition

Description:

You are a monster who finds themselves on a journey across tiny islands. To cross over to each new island, you need to push and roll trees to create bridges across the water. Along the way, your monster may come across museum exhibits to learn more about the world they are in.

Rank Explanation:

A Monster's Expedition's puzzle design takes a super simple idea and iterates on it both to create unique challenges and an even flow throughout the game. Just as you feel like you're reaching a point where pushing and rolling trees is getting tired, the game introduces a new mechanic or possibility that wasn't there before. This sense of pacing--along with overall immaculate design--makes A Monster's Expedition an absolute joy to play.


4. Overland

Description:

Overland is like if you took Death Road to Canada and XCOM and smashed them together. It’s a bite-sized tactics game about scavenging and surviving your way across a United States that has been overrun with hostile alien creatures. It’s also a run-based game and hard, so you’ll die a lot and have to restart in hopes of faring better on your next try.

Rank Explanation:

I can’t think of many other tactics games that are so carefully designed to feel like a console experience while also keeping mobile play in mind. It’s run-based nature also ensures high replayability.

Although Overland has a fantastic checkpointing system to make mobile play convenient, it’s not quite as easy to pick up and play anywhere quite like Card of Darkness is. Landscape mode, dark scenes, and technical graphics that can heat up your phone limit your ability to enjoy this game any and everywhere.

Update: Overland continues to be an incredible little tactics game. I can’t think of another title where I can encounter so many different kinds of scenarios in levels that can take just a few minutes to complete. Since release, Overland has only gotten better with new enemies, sleeker UI, and tons of polishing up.


5. Mutazione

Description:

Mutazione is an adventure game of sorts, but it relies much more on interpersonal relationships than puzzles. You play as a 15-year-old named Kai who has been sent to a small island town to care for your ailing grandfather. The twist is that everyone on this island just so happens to be a mutant. As you tend to your grandfather, you also get to know the inhabitants of this small town, primarily through speaking with them.

Rank Explanation:

I find Mutazione to be one of the best-looking titles on Apple Arcade. Something about its art direction really speaks to me. And as it turns out, creating a beautiful world that is fun to look at makes moving through it and engaging with all of its inhabitants that much more interesting. There’s also just some great writing and character work happening in Mutazione that make it one of the most compelling narrative offerings on the service.


6. Roundguard

Description:

Roundguard mixes elements of roguelikes and dungeon-crawlers with Peggle: You know, the packinco puzzle game. Players choose a hero who they then launch at pots of gold, potions, and—of course—enemies. Instead of having a limited number of balls per level, players need to manage their hit points, which lower when bouncing off of enemies or hitting spikes instead of a cushion at the bottom of a level.

Rank Explanation:

It may sound like a bit of an odd combination, but Roundguard is super fun. It’s the exact kind of game that Apple Arcade needs more of: A casual game that’s both endlessly replayable and deceptively deep. The only place Roundguard falters is how poorly it uses screen space. Otherwise, this game makes the case for re-upping your subscription for at least another month.

Update: I already thought Roundguard had great replay value, but now the game has daily and weekly challenges that mix things up and let you unlock new kinds of gear to find across all modes. Roundguard continues to be one of the best games to return to across Apple Arcade’s offerings.


7. Necrobarista*

Description:

Necrobarista is an interactive fiction game about a cafe that also serves as the gateway between the living and the dead. Its story focuses primarily around the former and current owners of the cafe, serving up charming slice of life interactions while also musing on mortality and existentialism. Most of the game involves simply tapping to advance scenes of dialogue, though it occasionally takes breaks to let you wander the cafe space in first person.

Rank Explanation:

Necrobarista far from a perfect game, but I thoroughly enjoyed my time with it nonetheless. Despite some technical issues and its ability to routinely make my iPad Pro get distressingly warm, I found the world-building and character moments in Necrobarista to be extremely compelling. There is definitely a laundry list of complaints you can weigh against this game, but its style and substance manage to overshadow its lack of polish.


8. Over the Alps

Description:

Discover the sights of the Swiss Alps as you weave a tale of mystery in a choose-your-own-adventure-style 1940s spy thriller. You play as an English agent who must constantly evade the authorities on a branching adventure that can takes you all over the picturesque countryside.

Rank Explanation:

Over the Alps is an impressively detailed narrative adventure. You spend most of the game just choosing dialogue options or actions from a preset list, but all of this is incredibly engaging because your choices influence both the story and inform how you should make future decisions. That’s right, as an undercover operative, Over the Alps forces you to consider how your actions might attract attention, which is a fun and thematically appropriate way to make your choices matter. Oh yea, it’s also really well written and every scene in Over the Alps looks like a vintage travel poster. The only thing that stinks about the game right now is that you can’t load your game unless you have an active data connection.

Update: With a couple of updates, Over the Alps fixed the ability to resume your progress without a data connection, plus there’s a whole new adventure to play. The game’s writing is as strong as ever in this new chapter, so make sure to check out Over the Alps if you haven’t already.


9. Unleash the Light

Description:

Steven Universe: Unleash the Light is Grumpyface’s followup to their previous Steven Universe title, Attack the Light. It’s an rpg featuring the characters and lore of Cartoon Network’s beloved Steven Universe series, and it heavily streamlines a lot of rpg mechanics into a small, mobile-ready package.

Rank Explanation:

I don’t know anything about Steven Universe, but this game is charming as heck. It feels like a Mario and Luigi rpg, but with characters that have more personality. It’s also really smartly designed so that it feels like you’re on an epic adventure, even though you’re playing through brief levels that are stitched together.

Update: The more time I sink into Unleash the Light, the more pleased I am by it. Despite its small scope, the game is packed with ways to customize your characters, complete sidequests, and switch up combat dynamics, and it's all set in wonderful, colorful world. The latest update to the game adds a new chapter, character, and gear to the mix, so there's reason to jump back into Unleash the Lighteven if you've already finished it.


10. Dear Reader

Description:

Most word games are about creating meaning from jumbles of letters. Dear Reader instead gives players excerpts from classic novels and creates many different kinds of challenges where you restore the texts to their original forms. It’s a simple concept, but Dear Reader constantly finds new ways to puzzle you with prose.

Rank Explanation:

I’m a proud English major, so when I first booted Dear Reader, I was skeptical. Most media that tries to celebrate classic literature devolves into saccharine fawning that’s downright embarrassing to witness. Dear Reader definitely doesn’t do this.

Although its initial puzzles are simple "fill in the blank" challenges that just so happen to be using prose from Pride and Prejudice, the game evolves to present over 20 different kinds of word play across tons of different titles that you can engage with on your own terms. If you want to play at a leisurely pace, great, but you can also turn things up a notch with speed reading difficulty settings and a daily challenge that gets harder over the course of a week.

Update: Dear Reader continues to be a strong title among Apple Arcade offerings. Adding a dark mode is tremendous (as someone who prefers light text on dark backgrounds), and more books means there’s more things to read. Seriously, play this game if you haven’t already. The daily challenge alone makes me feel ok with my Apple Arcade subscription.

Update: Dear Readergot updated with an additional layer of challenges, which personally don’t feel like they add a whole lot to the game. I’m perfectly happy continuing to play daily challenges and unlock books as they arrive, and perhaps the game’s updated tutorial might get a few new people feeling the same way.


11. Outlanders

Description:

Outlanders is a small-scale city builder where you manage a small community of rural villagers and attempt to reach goals set by their village leaders. You build small houses, harvest mushrooms, chop wood, etc. but things never get too developed. You need to manage the simple tools here and the available people in your village to do things like produce specific amounts of food or rebuild after a disaster.

Rank Explanation:

Calling Outlanders a city builder is actually a kind of a misnomer. Although you do manage the building up of your community, the whole experience is more like a puzzle game than anything else. This is because each level sets specific, time-based goals and there’s no sandbox mode that lets you just build whatever you want.

All of this takes place in a gorgeous world that heats up your phone to worrying temperatures fairly quickly. This, plus its slow pace and poor checkpointing make for a somewhat more disappointing game than it might otherwise be.

Update: The latest update to Outlanders makes it truly feel like a city builder now. You can now make your own little society in sandbox mode without having to worry about fulfilling specific requirements or using a limited toolset. The game also seems better optimized so it doesn’t heat up devices quite as much. Overall, it’s a massive improvement, making it one of Apple Arcade’s best offerings.


12. Tangle Tower

Description:

In Tangle Tower, you play as a pair of detectives, Grimoire and Sally, who are investigating a murder at Tangle Tower, an elaborate and mysterious mansion co-owned by two families. During your investigation, you interview the various family members, inspect rooms for clues, and solve puzzles to reveal new information and push the case forward.

Rank Explanation:

Tangle Tower scores lots of points for its animation work and voice acting. Characters are bursting with personality and charm. The game also has clever puzzle design mechanics that prevent you from getting stuck without needing hints. That being said though, it can sometimes feel like Tangle Tower pushes you down paths of deduction that you—the player—haven’t put together independently, which can be a little disappointing sometimes.

The final thing to note about Tangle Tower is how elegantly designed it is to work on mobile. Having full dialogue that is pause-able, indicators that let you know what you’ve already done, and suggestions of where to go once you get a break in the case all make it easy to jump in and out of this murder mystery without ever feeling like you’ll lose momentum.

Update: The latest update to Tangle Tower adds an art gallery feature, which isn’t too terribly exciting, though much more interesting than it sounds. Upon revisiting the game as a whole, I think it deserves a bump up in the rankings because of it has some of the most personality and charm out of any game on Apple Arcade.


13. Jenny LeClue - Detectivu

Description:

The world’s greatest detective lives in Arthurton. She’s also a child, and her name is Jenny LeClue. In Jenny LeClue - Detectivu feels a lot like an homage to traditional point-and-click adventure games, but it modernizes a lot of the genre’s mechanics to make things like pixel-hunting feel a lot more like being a real detective.

Rank Explanation:

This game is charming as all get out. It’s also remarkably clever, colorful, and smart. All the ways Jenny LeClue twists conventional adventure game mechanics makes for an experience that requires much less trial-and-error while still feeling like a satisfying challenge. This is definitely a top-tier adventure game.

Update: Full voice acting breathes even more life into Jenny LeClue. If you haven’t hopped into this great adventure game yet, now you have a great reason to.


14. Exit the Gungeon

Description:

Exit the Gungeon is an action roguelite that has elements of bullet hell shooters. You ride elevators and clear floors of enemies that are shooting at you constantly. A couple twists are that 1) bullets can’t hurt you as long as you are airborne (or rolling) and 2) your gun transforms to have different properties every few seconds. It’s a wild, hectic time.

Rank Explanation:

I have a hard time imagining another action-oriented game charting higher on this list. Exit the Gungeon is simply fantastic. It’s endlessly replayable, humorous, and devilishly difficult (without feeling unfair). While it is definitely best played using a controller, Exit the Gungeon changes its mechanics for touch play in a way that makes a manageable (though a bit less enjoyable) experience.

Update: Exit the Gungeon remains an incredible action offering. I’ll even take back what I said about the touch controls. They actually end up making the game feel like a different thing entirely. The new update adds a bunch of new stuff, which is great for a game that already feels varied and satisfying.


15. Neo Cab*

Description:

Neo Cab is a narrative adventure game where you work nights as a cab driver in the cyberpunk metropolis that is Los Ojos. As you drive around, you pick up all sorts of interesting characters and chat with them. All the while, you need to balance your car’s charge, your driver rating, and try to solve an overarching mystery.

Rank Explanation:

There’s a lot of things I really like about Neo Cab’s look and storytelling, but there’s also a lot of things that make it a pretty poor mobile experience. The game has a great vibe and sharp writing, but there are way too few checkpoints in the game and it auto-advances text by default. Even if you turn this option off, there are times where attempts to close the app can advance text before you’re done reading, and there’s no way to go back and see what you’ve missed.

These might seem like minor complaints, but for a game built around reading dialogue, having to re-read or completely miss certain sections of conversations is pretty irritating. That said, if you reserve Neo Cab for dedicated play sessions, you can minimize these issues and enjoy it quite a bit more.

Update: Neo Cab’s strength was always its writing, and the latest update to it adds more of it. It’s just a shame the new rides added to the game require you to play it over again. It’s still fun to revisit the world of Los Ojos though, even though some technical issues with frame rate, invisible riders, and delays in dialog triggers can bog it down at times. The game overall is better than I initially gave it credit for, but it’s still not the best mobile experience.


16. Monomals

Description:

Monomals is a cute and bright platformer about a fishing competition between animal DJs who are all hoping to catch creatures to help them make their music. The platforming involves piloting a fishing lure underwater through waters full of dangerous fish and other hazards.

Rank Explanation:

This game just has incredible style. It’s colorful, gorgeous, and joyous at every turn. Monomals also happens to be a pretty clever platformer that finds ways to challenge you without ever feeling particularly punishing. As you catch fish in the game, you unlock tools for a music creation mode, which is a fine-but-superfluous addition to addition to the game.

Update: With a new DJ contestant, that means seven new levels with a new musical theme have come to Monomals. Rocky Rhino adds some more guitars to the game’s soundtrack, which is fine, but the levels that accompany this addition are great. This game continues to charm the pants off me every time I fire it up.


17. WHAT THE GOLF?

Description:

Imagine an arcade golf game with Katamari Damacy-like sensibilities. That’s What the Golf? It’s a bunch of physics puzzles that are purportedly about hitting a golf ball into a hole, but very rarely is that actually what’s going on.

Rank Explanation:

What the Golf? is a game of surprises. As a pure puzzle game, it’s not all that challenging, but every level brings a new layer of humor and absurdity that makes you want to keep playing to see where it goes.

What the Golf? is held back slightly by its overworld navigation. Although it has some solid sight gags, it’s mostly just filler between levels. It also has a bug where it doesn’t appear to save your progress if the app is closed off of data. Hopefully that will be fixed soon.

Update 9/30: What the Golf? has been updated to eliminate the progress wiping bugs it had. Now, it’s super easy to recommend and thus one of the top Apple Arcade picks.

Update: Some new levels have been added to What the Golf? that present different takes on sports like hurdles and pole vaulting. They are reasonably enjoyable, but revisiting What the Golf? after its initial novelty has worn off does not do it any favors. If you already played and enjoyed What the Golf?, it’s probably better to preserve those feelings than come back to it at this point.

Update: Daily challenges don't help _What the Golf?_ whatsoever. The game really shines through its novelty, which grows stale the more you play it. This is doubly true when playing procedurally generated combinations of old puzzles and trying to compete over stroke count.


18. Spelldrifter

Description:

Spelldrifter mashes up collectible card game mechanics with those of a turn-based tactical rpg. You build a party, customize their decks, and then take three heroes into missions where you battle in close quarters. As you play, you start to unravel a story about how fate has tied your adventurers together.

Rank Explanation:

The first thing I’ll say about Spelldrifter is its tone kind of sucks. It reeks of lame baditude, but you can reduce most of this by simply playing the game on mute. Despite this issue, Spelldrifter has enough variety, mechanics, and depth to make it a really engaging and fun experience nonetheless. There’s tons of cool synergies and combos to play around with, and using that in a tactics-based environment feels really novel in a way that a lot of other Apple Arcade games don’t.


19. Sayonara Wild Hearts

Description:

Sayonara Wild Hearts is a gorgeous game about arcana, motorcycles, and pop music. At its core, it’s an auto-runner, but it’s packed with so much style and charm that you can’t (and won’t) want to just write it off like that.

Rank Explanation:

I love the everything about the way Sayonara Wild Hearts looks and sounds, to the point I thought it would be number one with a bullet here before Apple Arcade even launched. Then, I played it and found the controls to be a little swimmy in a way that basically guarantees I won’t revisit it. Also, the full effect of this game only works when you have headphones in, which limits your ability to play and enjoy it on the go. Make no mistake though: This game is a must-play.

I can only see myself playing Sayonara Wild Hearts once, making it a great game to play through using the Apple Arcade trial. That one time may be one of the most dazzling experiences I’ve ever had with a game, but it will then fall by the wayside as I return to other fantastic games with higher replay value.

Update: I was drawn back to Sayonara Wild Hearts mostly because I missed its style. Once I came back to it though, I remembered how muddy the controls are, and even was turned off by some of the music in the game. It still an audio/visual spectacle, but I kinda wish Sayonara Wild Hearts felt a little tighter in terms of production, both mechanically and aurally.


20. South of the Circle (NEW)

Description:

South of the Circle is a narrative adventure game about explorers that find themselves stranded in the Antarctic. Along the way, your characters flash back to moments in their life leading up to this harrowing adventure, which also allow you to make some decisions to influence the story.

Rank Explanation:

Although there are some light puzzle-solving elements,South of the Circle is primarily a storytelling vehicle. This is a good thing though, as the game’s voice acting, art direction, and animations are all top-notch. Make sure to check this game out if you’re hankering for a unique story.


21. Cardpocalypse

Description:

Everyone at Jess’s new school is obsessed with a new card game, and she manages to get it banned on her first day. Cardpocalypse tells the story of Jess’s journey through the game of Mega Mutant Power Pets and how it shapes her childhood. Along the way you build your own decks of the card game and play it yourself in hopes of being an unstoppable opponent.

Rank Explanation:

Cardpocalypse has a way of capturing the fervor young children can have for games. There’s a surprising amount of story dividing up the collectible card game action of Cardpocalypse, and frankly, it makes the game way more interesting than it would be otherwise. The card game is competent, but the way its contexualized within the overarching story makes it worth playing.


22. Hexaflip

Description:

Hexaflip is an action puzzle game where you flip a hexagon through environments to reach an exit. It’s got simple controls, but it creates challenge by adding some time pressure to each level.

Rank Explanation:

This game just feels really nice to play. It moves at a silky smooth 60 frames per second, looks nice, and provides great haptic feedback every time you flip your hexagon. Levels are also nice and bite-sized, making it a great title for a quick burst of Apple Arcade action.


23. Spaceland

Description:

Spaceland is a turn-based strategy game about killing aliens with space marines. Despite the tired premise, this game layers a bunch of little mini-systems on its base gameplay to make it feel original.

Rank Explanation:

This kind of feels like what Gears POP! should have been. You have a crew of space marines with different weapons and abilities, and you move them around cover to blast subterranian aliens and close up their emergence holes. It also does a bit more than your standard tactics game with things like an ammo crate system that forces you to move about the map to reload. Although it may look a little plain, there’s actually a lot to like about Spaceland.

Update: The more I play Spaceland, the more I’m convinced it’s the ultimate Apple Arcade sleeper hit. Despite it’s generic visuals, the game very much has its own sense of identity and a core design that’s unique from other tactics games out there. The latest update to the game provides a daily run mode which gives the game some more replayability, plus a secret boss to try and uncover. Spaceland has also been updated with multiplayer functionality, but that only seems practical for those who have friends to play with.

Update: _Spaceland_ got new kinds of daily missions, which further builds out the tiny tactics game that could. Not much more to say here except you should play it if you haven't already.


24. Dread Nautical

Description:

When a cruise ship gets invaded by mysterious dark forces, you need to fight for survival. In Dread Nautical, you choose a character to face off in turn-based tactical missions where you explore sections of the cruise ship. All the while, you’re on the hunt for food, new party members, and opportunities to sneak attack otherworldly horrors.

Rank Explanation:

I can’t think of a modern game that channels old B-games from the late 90s quite like Dread Nautical does. This is to say the game lacks quite a bit of polish, but mostly in a way that is really endearing. The tactics here aren’t super complicated, and the game itself can test your patience, but something about the game’s weird production values makes it oddly magnetic.

Update: If you’ve finished Dread Nautical, now you have a reason to go back to it. The game recently got updated with a New Game Plus mode, which ups the difficult as well as the quality and quantity of loot you can find on your maritime dungeon-crawl. This game is still weirdly strong and worth sinking time into.


25. Slash Quest! (NEW)

Description:

Slash Quest! is a colorful action game where you steer a sword much in the same way you might a shopping cart to chop down enemies and solve environmental puzzles.

Rank Explanation:

This game reminds me a lot of b-tier Playstation platformers, and I mean that as a term of endearment. There’s a charming weirdness here that’s hard to put your finger on, and it backs up its simple goofy mechanics with systems that are geniunely fun to play around with.

The list continues here, or see below to jump to another page:

1-25 | 26-50 | 51-75 | 76-100 | 101+

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