This is part 3 of our Apple Arcade Ranking list. To see part 1, go here. To go back to part 2, click here.


101. Sociable Soccer

Description:

Sociable Soccer is an arcade soccer game where you build a dream team of footballers to try and take down other players’ teams. Along the way, you pick up other players to add to your roster, which you can use to create alternate lineups or feed to your other players to upgrade their stats. The whole thing feels a lot like a gacha game, except you can't spend any money on it.

Rank Explanation:

I’m very frustrated by Sociable Soccer. It constantly teases you with gestures at good ideas, but they all turn out to be empty. The arcade soccer is so simplistic that it feels kind of random. Collecting and upgrading players is a ridiculously long grind (especially since the game limits how many times you can play matches). Managing your team involves arranging formations of players, and... nothing else. This is to say that Sociable Soccer has set up a bunch of great structures for creating a fun sports game with rpg elements, but said structures aren’t filled with anything satisfying.


102. Way of the Turtle*

Description:

Way of the Turtle is a very conventional platformer starring two turtles. These turtles may walk automatically, but you choose when they jump or when they use their different shell powers that they accumulate over the course of the game.

Rank Explanation:

There’s nothing wrong with Way of the Turtle’s concept per se, but it also doesn’t feel all that special. It’s just very expected. This is the kind of game that may be satisfying at times, but is rarely surprising.

It’s also worth noting that Way of the Turtle bugged out a few times loading into the game on a couple occasions, and I had to restart it to get it working properly again.

After Way of the Turtle got a new content update, so I decided to give it another shot, and it wasn’t pretty. For whatever reason, Way of the Turtle had not saved any of my previous progress when I came back to it. It also decided that each time I came back to the game it would keep my progress (good), but always start me back at the beginning of the game map some reason (not good). This, plus the fact that Way of the Turtle has a confusingly poor frame rate on iPad drove me away from the game faster than it did when I first tried it.


103. Redout: Space Assault

Description:

You like Starfox? Well, Redout: Space Assault is kind of like that, which is to say it’s an on-rails space shooter. Your ship fires automatically and follows a set path, but you have to fine-tune the maneuvering of your ship to shoot at enemies, avoid obstacles, and shake heat-seeking missiles off your tail.

Rank Explanation:

Redout: Space Assault scores poorly because of how generic it is. There’s almost nothing about the game that makes it special. Even the graphics, which I guess arguably are technically “good,” don’t really read as impressive, nor do they enhance the experience all that much.



104. Big Time Sports

Description:

Big Time Sports is a colorful mini-game collection that where you participate in sporting events like basketball, skiing, and skateboarding by performing quick-time events.

Rank Explanation:

Big Time Sports may feature more sports, but it feels like an also-ran to Cricket Through the Ages. There’s some charm to its visuals, but it lacks the goofiness that mini-game collections traditionally rely on to keep you engaged.


105. Word Laces

Description:

Word Laces gives you a picture and a bunch of letters below it. From there, you’re supposed to figure out the words you should spell using the letters given based on the picture. As you get further into Word Laces, you start having to solve puzzles with multiple words and more complicated answers.

Rank Explanation:

I generally like word games, but Word Laces is really not for me. Guessing words based on pictures is a novel idea, but it’s really easy to have different associations with pictures than those of the game designers. There are no penalties for forming words incorrectly or misspelling things, which I guess keeps it from being frustrating, but it also removes all the stakes. As a result, Word Laces doesn’t really feel like a game so much as just “a thing to do,” and there are enough other things to do on Apple Arcade that I’d prefer to spend my time elsewhere.


106. Lifeslide

Description:

Lifeslide is a game about being a paper airplane. You glide around, picking up “parts” and “time” which help you upgrade your plane and continue flying respectively.

Rank Explanation:

This is one of those games that really wants you to tilt your phone to control something. Perhaps it’s better if you play it that way, but I refuse to do that. Instead, I changed Lifeslide’s controls to touch and experienced what is a pretty dull flying game. If someone hops in the comments here as the Lifeslide defender, I might give it a chance using tilt controls, but until then, no thanks.


107. Lifelike

Description:

Lifelike is an abstract game about flocking particles. You move an orb of light around flatly colored backgrounds until you reach spheres of particles that you move into to activate. From there, the particles move with you until you wander into a new set of particles. If that sounds weird, then I’m describing it well. Lifelike is weird.

Rank Explanation:

I’m not opposed to abstract games, but I literally fell asleep playing Lifelike. In piloting my little light around, I felt like I was wandering aimlessly to no end or purpose, waiting for something to happen, and what happened was I got bored. While this game is certainly pretty, there’s just precious little to Lifelike that makes it worth checking out.


108. Explottens

Description:

In Explottens, you are a hot shot pilot who also happens to be a cat. The plane bit doesn’t really matter though, because the game itself is basically just a level-based dual-stick shooter where you can move your plane in any direction you want at any time or just hover in mid-air at will.

Rank Explanation:

Explottens feels like a pretty slapped-together game. Your plane doesn’t feel like a plane, there are extreme swings of difficulty between levels, and there’s a currency that appears before entering levels that doesn’t appear to correspond to anything else in the game. As you play more Explottens the odd choices keep stacking up, and none of them feel intentional, nor do they make the game enjoyable.


109. Marble It Up: Mayhem!*

Description:

Marble It Up: Mayhem! is a platfomer that puts a lot of emphasis behind momentum and physics. You roll a marble around levels and you need to hop over gaps, gather gems, and reach and exit, while making sure not to roll too fast that you accidentally slide of a ledge or hit a bumper to send your marble flying.

Rank Explanation:

I have never really understood why you’d want to play a platformer where your ability to control things feels muddy and slow, but games like Marble It Up: Mayhem prove there is some kind of audience for these things. Even placing my personal hang-ups aside, I’m not sure Marble It Up is great at what it’s trying to do. Half the time I try to trigger the jump button, it doesn’t seem to work, and the game’s multiplayer mode is a barely functional mess. Not great!


110. Loud House: Outta Control

Description:

Remember Flight Control? Well, Loud House: Outta Control is basically the same game, but it features locations and characters from Nickelodeon’s animated series, The Loud House. Characters wander onto the screen and you have to draw walking paths for them to reach specific objectives while making sure no one runs into each other. It’s a basic concept that can get complicated quickly.

Rank Explanation:

I have no familiarity with The Loud House, but I used to play a ton of Flight Control, and Outta Control feels like a bad knock-off version of a classic. Although this game tries to mix up the action with different kinds of levels, Outta Control feels weirdly imprecise for a game where you literally draw lines for characters to walk along. Even if you don’t have any intersecting paths, characters still seem quite easy to have run into each other, which immediately ends the level you’re on, leaving you no option but to try it again from the very beginning. It’s pretty frustrating and unimaginative from top to bottom.


111. Things That Go Bump

Description:

Imagine a fighting game where you have to build your character as you play. That’s kind of what Things That Go Bump is going for. You control a spirit that possesses household objects to build a body of sorts that you then use to battle other spirits doing the same thing. You do this in either a single-player wave-based “Horde Mode” or online up against up to three other players.

Rank Explanation:

There’s not a whole lot to Things That Go Bump’s combat, and it seems like a lot of other people agree. The online multiplayer for this game is a ghost town, leaving you only with the option to play the Horde Mode, which isn’t a whole lot of fun, either.


112. Operator 41

Description:

Operator 41 is a stealth action game where each level involves moving your spy past guards to reach a telephone. Your character and guards move in real-time, so you need to time your movements carefully and take advantage of distractions to avoid getting caught.

Rank Explanation:

Operator 41’s stealth mechanics are not particularly innovative and the game itself exudes zero personality. You could play this game, but there’s nothing about it that makes you want to do so.


113. Secret Oops

Description:

This is essentially a spy-themed Lemmings game. Your special agent infiltrates buildings by blindly walking straight ahead toward his goals, and you have to look out for him by tapping cameras to shut them off, open doors for him, and reveal evidence for him to gather. Secret Oops is also largely designed around augmented reality, where you can move your phone or tablet around to get a better view of your agents actions and the obstacles that lay ahead.

Rank Explanation:

The idea of playing a game where I have to physically move my phone around to get a better view of the action is completely unappealing. Secret Oops gives you the option to play in a non-AR mode, but it’s virtually impossible to see and tap the things you need to tap while playing this way. Even if the game was more playable outside of the AR mode, Secret Oops would still feel pretty generic and unimpressive.


114.Fallen Knight

Description:

There’s not a whole lot I can say about Fallen Knight. It’s an action platformer. You run, you jump, you swing your sword at things. It’s about as simple as that.

Rank Explanation:

Part of the reason I can’t say much to describe Fallen Knight is because its controls feel so broken. The virtual buttons for the game don’t trigger until you release your finger from the screen. This isn’t so much the case if you play with a controller, but Fallen Knight’s timing windows are clearly tuned for touch. As a result, you have two extremely awkward methods for controlling this game, to the point that Fallen Knight is basically unplayable.

This is part 3 of our Apple Arcade Ranking list. To see part 1, go here. To go back to part 2, click here.

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