Developer: Flexile Studio
Price: $0.99
Version Reviewed: 1.0
App Reviewed on: iPhone 3GS

Graphics/Sound Rating: ★★★★½
Game Controls Rating: ★★★☆☆
Gameplay Rating: ★★★★☆
Replay Value Rating: ★★★½☆Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

It is probably a good thing that were the passengers sitting next to me on Chicago’s El train to look over, they would have seen me playing a cute game where I am a slime clinging to things, jumping, and grabbing toilet paper and underpants. While perhaps the potty humor would not be to everyone’s taste, it would seem a lot less creepy than the title the game originally came with: Wimp: Who Stole My Pants? I imagine some of the issue may well be lost in translation, Flexile Studio being Belarusian. What is not lost in the translation is a fun romp that leans far more toward its puzzle rather than action roots (which is not to say the platforming is always easy).

Wimp has but a few abilities: running left and right, jumping, and sticking to things. It’s the sticking to things that makes some of the puzzles more interesting, as not only can it be used to avoid traps that would shred poor Wimp, but there is also the ability to stick to a box, lean in one direction or another, and then push it over. Naturally, as the game goes on, this becomes more complex, and the little green blob that is Wimp will find new ways of flitting about the screen.

Which would be the second sticking point for this title: it has charm. Watching Wimp bound along is genuinely joyful, in opposition to watching the little green blob dissolve in acid. Each level traversed has three rolls of toilet paper, which can be collected to unlock other worlds. However, in any particular level, only the underpants need be collected to progress to the next level in that world. This is particularly useful as sometimes the path to getting all of the toilet paper is not abundantly clear, which means it is easy enough to clear out and then come back to at a later point.

If there is one point that does not quite gel quite as it should it would be that the controls are not absolutely spot-on, which can make dealing with platforming a bit difficult. The buttons for walking left and right feel a bit too close, so that I would sometimes find myself walking in the direction opposite that which I desired. It was never too horrible, but was still annoying when I found myself having to restart at a checkpoint.

For a quick, simple play, the earlier levels of Wimp offer quite a bit, and as the play progresses there is a bit of an increase in difficulty not just in puzzles, but how the platforming functions. Thankfully, as I stated, unless going for the completionist route, there is plenty to do without getting too frustrated. Also of note, there is an HD version available.