Developer: Clickgamer.com
Price: $0.99
Version Reviewed: 1.0

Graphics / Sound Rating: ★★★★☆
Game Controls Rating: ★★★★½
Gameplay Rating: ★★★★☆
Re-use / Replay Value Rating: ★★★☆☆

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

Helsing’s Fire, as the Van Helsing name would suggest, is a demon hunting puzzle game (I guess the puzzle aspect is a bit out of left field). Instead of putting out a tried and true puzzle variation, Clickgamer.com created an entirely new puzzle system which works rather well for the theme.

The game consists of “90 distinct” levels, situated over three worlds, with each world containing a boss level. The levels are extremely short, with you as the “torchbearer” out to kill the evil forces on the map. To kill the enemies, you must shine your torch on them and then use a potion to finish them off. There are three different colored potions though, and each enemy is color coded, so you must be careful on how you cast the light and use your potions. If you hit an enemy with the wrong potion, they get more powerful, typically ending your chances very quickly.

As you progress through the game, different enemies will start using different defense mechanisms, such as colored shields that you have to break down with potions,disappearing in the light, and even shooting back at you. Because the levels only contain a handful of enemies each, they usually only last about 40 seconds, with anything longer making the Van Helsing character say something like “my eyelids are getting heavy”.

The problem with Helsing’s Fire is that it takes a bit too long to offer up any sort of real challenge. I’d say that I breezed through the first 45-50 levels without having as much as a hiccup, which I think was about 25 levels too many. Make some of the levels in the first world harder and I’d be just a bit happier.

Even with the fairly shallow level of difficulty, you’ll keep on playing because of the games great sense of style and fun. The levels look extremely nice with the light peering around the corners, and the banter between Helsing and his assistant, Raffton, provides an amusing segue into the levels.

Part of me wants to be harsh about the difficulty levels, but the other part of me just wants to keep playing to see what happens in the game. While I do wish the game was more difficult, it’s just too fun to put down, which can only mean good things. After the game is over though, I can’t see myself playing the game much at all, as none of the levels give you that “epic” feel that requires a replay. I suppose that I’ll just have to wait for the sequel.

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