Developer: Cube Interactive
Price: $2.99
Version Reviewed: 1.0.5
App Reviewed on: iPad 3

Graphics / Sound Rating: ★★★★☆
Storytelling/Gameplay Rating: ★★★★☆
Intuitiveness Rating: ★★★★☆
Re-use / Replay Value Rating: ★★★★☆

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

Dipdap is a creative app for young children, based on a British TV show of the same name, that I am eager to let readers know about. Dipdap is an interactive app about a boy and his companion, namely the line drawing he spends time with, as this drawing takes the shape of varied things to create short animated moments complete with children’s own sketches.

Dipdap is simple to use but kind of hard to describe. Sixteen scenes are included, each including a brightly colored background that stars Dipdap, a stylized maroon-colored little boy, along with other simple details that begin to create a theme for each section where children then add related details to. Here, a simple template is included, be it that of a rocket that Dipdap then flies off into the sky in, an umbrella to keep dry under, or drawing a ladder to help Dipdap climb to the moon. I really enjoy how, although an outline is given to color in or trace over, one can design something of one’s own imagination that will equally work within these scenes, also allowing parents to remove the guide and allowing them to draw anything they wish in these scenes. The animation included is quite witty and fun with unexpected surprises that really make me smile, such as when asked to design a ball for Dipdap to dunk much like a basketball, multiple balls drop from the net – much to my delight. These scenes can be saved to view later, or exported to share with friends and family and more.

8I love the perceived simplicity in these stylized moving illustrations; a contrast to my own drawing never comes close to those included within, leaving a bit of a disconnect between my line drawings and the guide I am working from. Three color choices in varied combinations are offered when creating one’s drawing as well as a single point size in which to work. At first I found this to be problematic as I prefer to have a choice of size lines with which to draw, especially if I am tracing over an outline of some sorts. Too many drawing choices, however, would clutter up this clean and interestingly minimal experience as well as alter the proportions too greatly from the other elements in each theme to those lines one adds on. These details work together in collaboration to complete these scenes in a way that really makes me smile. Likewise, I have mixed feelings about my drawing appearing on the screen with every brush stroke instead of a completed sketch in playback mode. I can imagine some children enjoying the ability to view the process of their drawing, but for some situations like when a big reveal is in order – such as what may be popping from a cracking egg – I would rather see the character I drew as a whole, especially the time it may take me to illustrate a specific detail does not translate well to be viewed in real time. Because of this, I wish the playback of every line drawn were an option instead of the only choice offered.

1I can’t help but think of Harold and the Purple Crayon as the line drawings, often popping up from the horizon Dipdap is walking on, create vivid scenes for Dipdap to interact within. My mind also jogs to classic cartoons about drawing an anvil in order to crush a ringing alarm clock, also really appreciating the background sounds included – both the happy-go-lucky whistling of Dipdap and the upbeat background tune being heard as well as the jazzy Mancini-like musical cues that add sophisticated moments of suspense as these scenes unfold. I have been unaware of Dipdap until now, but I can easily recommend this app for families like mine who do not have a background watching the show, and I am sure fans of it will get a kick out of this app as well.

Posted in: Art, By Age Range, By App Feature, Creativity, Education, iPad Apps and Games, iPad Education, iPhone Apps and Games, Just For Fun, Parents and Kids, Preschool, Primary School, Reviews, Stories, Toddlers

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