Posts Tagged GoodReader

An iOS device, just by itself, is capable of many things but file handling is not one of them. Thankfully, there are ways to get files from one’s computer to an iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch with or without a cable. Here are two of the best ways to transfer files to and from your iOS device.

Dropbox

The great thing about Dropbox is that it syncs up very easily with multiple devices. Apps are available for every major platform, but the most convenient thing is that it’s possible to set it up on a computer where Dropbox folders work just like local storage. This way, files can be saved to Dropbox folders and made available easily wherever Dropbox access is available. There’s also access for uploading and downloading files through the web browser for those who just need quick access or can’t install the app for computers.

Don’t worry, files in Dropbox aren’t just stuck in Dropbox’s app. It’s possible to open files in compatible apps. Just tap the arrow in the upper-right corner, tap Open In… and choose the appropriate app. This way, PDFs can be signed in DocuSign Ink, or text files opened in Byword, for example.

HowToFileTransfer-DropboxOpenIn

Those who prefer a Google bent to their cloud storage might want to check out Google Drive – it provides much of the same functionality.

GoodReaderfor iPad and iPhone

The beauty of GoodReader is that when it comes to storing and handling local files, no app beats it. Most any file can be opened up in it at least for storage, if not viewing and using in some fashion. Of course, if the app just existed by itself, it’d be useless. Thankfully, getting files to and from GoodReader is a breeze. You can link up a cloud storage service like Dropbox, add in an FTP server, or even SMB/AFP servers for getting files to and from computers with shared folders.

HowToFileTransfer-GoodreaderCloud

As well, tap the wifi icon in the app to enable wifi transfer mode, where connecting to the given URL through a web browser will allow you to download and upload files. As well, the app supports transferring files through iTunes’ file sharing.

HowToFileTransfer-GoodReaderWifiTransfer

Sadly, just using one’s iOS device as a USB storage device is difficult without the use of outside programs like i-FunBox installed on every computer, which of course kind of beats the point of having a USB storage device. It may be possible through jailbreak utilities, but jailbreaking is more trouble than it’s worth. Have any other useful ways for transferring files? Let us know in the comments.

The iPhone is great not just because it’s a camera, but because it’s also a great photo editing device, along with the iPod touch and especially the iPad. Now, there’s a good chance that some of your most treasured photos are on there already. But it’s not your only camera. Maybe you own a super-sweet DSLR that you use for real photos, and there’s that one photo that would get so many likes on Instagram. Maybe you have an Android phone (gasp!) but want to edit those photos with Camera+. Woe is your fate to have these photos be trapped on these disparate devices!

But lo, there  are ways to free them from their digital prisons through many different processes. Despite iOS’s user-friendly reputation, these methods aren’t necessarily as smooth as they should be, as just adding a photo to an iOS device is kind of like walking into Mordor. But what I am here to show you today is a method that is relatively simple, and that involves as little file transformation as possible, so photos should lose little to none of the quality they had, while still being usable on your iOS devices.

Here’s what you’re going to need:

  • Your photos ready on your computer in JPEG or PNG format.
  • i-FunBox – available for Mac or PC
  • GoodReader for iPhone or iPad.
  • Regular readers will recall i-FunBox from an earlier How To article on transferring app save files, which is worth a read for the basics on what the app is and what it does. When ready, load up i-FunBox. On the left sidebar, click the dropdown arrow next to App File Sharing. Select GoodReader from the list.

    Now, if you use the app, you’ll see your downloaded files here. Otherwise, if this folder is blank, then just add your photos here – the fact that this supports folders gives it an advantage over using iTunes’s built-in file sharing method, though you will have to open up the folder that you want to add photos to – you cna’t drag and drop files into folders with i-FunBox.

    Now, open up GoodReader on your device. The main page of the app should show the files you just added. To add a picture to your Camera Roll, tap on it to open it up, and then tap the camera icon superimposed with an arrow on the bottom taskbar. Repeat this for each photo you want in your Camera Roll. For massive photo libraries, this may take a while, but it will ensure that the actual original photo is being copied to the Camera Roll.

    The photos are now resting comfortably in your Camera Roll, ready to be edited, shared, iMessaged, or whatever your heart desires! Have another preferred method for getting your photos on to your iOS device? Let us know in the comments.

    I was recently perusing the internet, and saw a question from a Reddit user that would make for a great how-to article. User “highdefinition3” asked how to transfer documents between computers using the iPhone.

    Now, there’s no way to do this with methods that are built-in to iOS. Apple doesn’t provide a way to use an iOS device as disk storage like the old iPods did. However, there are definitely ways to do this through various apps. One good way to do this is through the app GoodReader. It’s available on both iPhone and iPad, though through separate apps, although both function in similar ways.

    There are two primary ways to transfer files between computers using GoodReader as an intermediary: through iTunes, and through a web browser.

    iTunes file transfer is simple, and can be done through both over USB and wifi. Select the device from the sidebar in iTunes, then click on the Apps tab. Scroll down to iTunes file transfer. Then select GoodReader. Either use the “Add…” button or drag and drop any files into the directory.

    Repeat this process on the other computer to download files from the iOS device. Note that while it’s possible to download entire folders from iTunes, opening and downloading individual files from a folder is not quite possible in iTunes yet. Packaging folders as a ZIP file is the easiest way to transfer folders.

    The other method is to use GoodReader’s wifi transfer capability. Launch GoodReader, and select its wifi option. This sets up a wifi server that can be used to upload files to the device from a web browser, and then any other computer on the network can also download files from that device. It is also possible to map the drive as a network drive, allowing for files to be transferred to and from the iOS device as if it were an actual storage device.

    The downside to this and many other apps is that they are all essentially stuck in the app – if the app is deleted, then the files disappear. Public computers may not have USB access, or limited permissions that would make downloading the files or setting up the network file server difficult. As such, this may be best not be a serious method of file transfer, but as a matter of convenience in a pinch.

    $4.99
    iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
    Released: 2009-02-28 :: Category: Productivity

    $4.99
    iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
    Released: 2010-04-01 :: Category: Productivity

    GoodReader for iPad Review

    iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
    GoodReader is a top option for viewing, reading, annotating, and moving documents on the iPad. It features a full and robust suite of PDF features and viewing support for a large variety of document types.

    Read The Full Review »

    As the year winds down and we look ahead to the next decade it’s time for all those wonderful end-of-year lists we all get so excited about. Today we have some exciting news, as Apple has detailed all the top paid and free apps for the iPhone and iPad, as well as the top grossing apps on each platform. Here’s the full rundown, for your edification.

    Top 10 Paid iPhone Apps

    1. Angry Birds
    2. Doodle Jump
    3. Skee-Ball
    4. Bejeweled 2 + Blitz
    5. Fruit Ninja
    6. Cut the Rope
    7. ALL-IN-1 GAMEBOX
    8. The Moron Test
    9. Plants vs. Zombies
    10. Pocket God

    Top 10 Free iPhone Apps

    1. Facebook
    2. Angry Birds Lite
    3. Words With Friends Free
    4. Skype
    5. Tap Tap Revenge 3
    6. The Weather Channel®
    7. Paper Toss
    8. Bing
    9. ROCK BAND FREE
    10. Talking Tom Cat

    Top 10 Grossing iPhone Apps

    1. MLB.com At Bat 2010
    2. Angry Birds
    3. Call of Duty: Zombies
    4. Bejeweled 2 + Blitz
    5. FriendCaller 3 Pro
    6. Zombie Farm
    7. TomTom U.S.A.
    8. TETRIS®
    9. Plants vs. Zombies
    10. Doodle Jump

    REad even MORE lists after the jump.

    Continue reading Apple Lists 2010 Top Apps »

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