Posts Tagged AirPlay

The soon to be released Real Racing 3 is on a lot of iOS gamers’ minds these days, especially many of us here at 148Apps. Because of this we thought it would be a good idea to recap the series. In fact, we might have gone a bit beyond that and created a trilogy. First we’ll be taking a look at the series’ history and the history of Firemint, the Melbourne based studio that created the series. After that we’ll be taking a look at the design factors and what when into creating the first two Real Racing titles as well as a little of the third. And in the third part of this series, we’ll take a look at the new Time Shifted Multiplayer found in Real Racing 3.


Humble Beginnings

One of the best-known examples of how far developers can push Apple’s new iPhone 5 hardware is looming just over the horizon. However, it wasn’t always so. Sure the Real Racing series has steadily become pretty much synonymous with near console-quality visuals on mobile platforms, even going so far as to have a permanent spot on the App Store’s Big-Name Games and Racing Games lists, but there was once a time when no one knew the name Firemint. This was around four years ago, when most mobile games were still easily distinguished from virtually every other platform. You know, when Solitaire and box-pushing puzzles came preloaded on everything and acquiring new games wasn’t anywhere near as convenient as it is now. Oddly enough, the developer’s first major innovation wasn’t even based around graphics.

According to Kynan Woodman, Real Racing 3’s Development Director, the original Real Racing was actually more of an experiment than a real game. Specifically they were trying to figure out how to rig up accelerometer steering for a Nokia handset in a way that wasn’t awkward or unnatural. Keep in mind this was back in 2008, and up to that point attempts at such a control scheme would tilt the view along with everything else which wasn’t exactly conducive to a driving game. “To solve this problem we tilted the horizon dynamically to counter your steering of the device,” he said, “so that regardless of where you moved the horizon in the game would match the real world. It seems obvious now, but no one had done it at the time.” Firemint didn’t just find a work-around for a common problem, the team developed a solution that set a new design standard for accelerometer controls.

Building A Unique Race

Once it had the horizon tilting figured out, Firemint began to construct the game that would eventually become Real Racing around it. “There was a lot more to the Real Racing franchise than great controls,” said Woodman, “but it started with that as a key innovation.” As it turns out, innovation ended up being Firemint’s calling card of sorts.

The developer’s second major task was to construct an interior view that the series has come to be known for, “… so players could actually see the steering wheel move as they steered,” Woodman said. It’s a feature that isn’t uncommon in console racing games these days (Codemasters’ Race Driver: Grid is a prime example), but it’s not prevalent in many – if any – iOS racers. The added level of detail, and by extension immersion, goes a long way to enhancing the “simulation” experience.

The decision to create a racing game built around closed tracks was made fairly early on in the cycle, however, but the rest of the design evolved as the game was developed. No one at Firement (now Firemonkeys) expected their project to become such a juggernaut on the App Store or to be the target of much speculation when early gameplay footage (above) was first revealed on PocketGamer in August of 2008. “We particularly enjoyed all the comments from consumers about how it was ‘clearly fake,’” said Woodman. Encouraged by these reactions, Firemint continued its work on through 2009, listening to fan and potential consumer feedback all the while. “We had a good idea of what people would like from the game,” he said, “because we could read comments and talk to press and consumers about it. Although we couldn’t do everything that players would like, we did use their feedback to help us focus the game design.”

Not Just A Racing Game Studio

Amidst all the hullabaloo surrounding console-quality visuals and innovations up the wazoo it can be easy to forget that Firemint doesn’t only make racing games. In fact, before Real Racing came out, it was already flying high (*rimshot*) thanks to the success of Flight Control. This casual mobile rendition of a day in the life on an air traffic controller began as a simple experiment concocted by Firemint CEO Robert Murray. It was meant to be a simple design exercise created over the winter break when the studio was shut down for the holidays, but garnered so much attention around the studio that fellow Firemint designers, Alexandra Peters and Jesse West, hopped on board to help turn it into a full-blown game–a good call considering that it’s sold over half-a-million copies in its first month and well over three million to date.

Award Winner

The original Real Racing went on to receive plenty of accolades, including 2010’s Apple Design and IMGA’s Excellence in Connectivity Awards, as well as a Best App Ever Award for Best Racing Game, Best Graphics, and Best Simulation Game in 2009. It’s also sold a whole bunch–and that’s just the first game. Not surprisingly, after Real Racing was launched in June of 2009, work on Real Racing 2 began roughly 6 months later.

The sequel to Firemint’s critical darling turned its fair share of heads as well when it was released in December of 2010. In addition to carrying over all the new concepts and special features that made the original Real Racing so noteworthy, Real Racing 2 added plenty of new items to its pedigree. The career mode was greatly expanded upon by allowing players to earn cash to purchase new cars and even upgrade their current ones. More camera options were added along with a special TV broadcast-style instant replay system. Vehicles were given damage models so that particularly rough races would leave telltale signs all over the racer’s cars. Online save options were added to allow players a chance to carry over their racing career when they installed the game to a new device. It was one of the first games to incorporate Apple’s Airplay technology which allowed players to view their games on their TV, using their iOS device as a stand-in for a controller. Actually, it allowed up to four players to view their games on the bigger screen all at once by way of the special Party Mode.

Last but not least, and in keeping with the whole “innovation” thing, Firemint also managed to include 16 player races (against AI in single player or 15 other people online), which was a first for iOS games at the time and no small feat in and of itself. All of these various features reportedly pushed Real Racing 2’s development costs to over $2 million. So it wasn’t just a first for iOS multiplayer, it was also a first for iOS development costs. Real Racing 2 has received a fair share of success with a combined (critic) Metacritic score of 94 to date along with taking the Best App Ever Awards for Racing and Graphics in 2010. With so many hits on Firemint’s hands, it’s no wonder large publishers like EA took notice.

Big Changes

The following year, Firemint was absorbed into the collective that is Electronic Arts. Some were understandably concerned about the acquisition, as it’s not uncommon for smaller studios to lose most of what makes them special (or get dismantled entirely) once they become a part of a much larger whole. However, Firemint CEO Rob Murray, as well as EA Interactive’s Executive VP, Barry Cottle, were quick to put those fears to rest by recalling the developer’s history. Many of Firemint’s pre-Flight Control and pre-iOS releases (Need for Speed Most Wanted, Madden, etc) were created while under contract for EA Mobile. One could even argue that EA helped to shape the folks at Firemint into the dream team they are today. Getting bought by one of the largest video game publishers in the business while being able to maintain their creative freedom made for an exciting opportunity for the already quite successful developer. But it didn’t end there. In July of 2012, Firemint joined forces with IronMonkey Studios (Dead Space, Need for Speed Undercover) to create Firemonkeys. I hope they braced for all the inevitable Infernape jokes beforehand. Since then, EA’s involvement has most likely influenced Firemint’s/Firemonkey’s pricing structures, but overall it seems like they’ve left the developer to do their own thing, which is to make fantastic games.

A more recent and potentially troubling development was the announcement that Rob Murray–former CEO of Firemint, mastermind behind Flight Control, and Executive Producer at Firemonkeys–would be leaving to spend time as a full-time dad. It’s a perfectly good reason to step down and Tony Lay, EA’s Melbourne Studio GM, has more than enough experience to see Real Racing 3 to its release as the new Executive Producer, but it’s difficult not to have a little concern over what this means for Firemonkeys. Development heads come and go from time to time, as is the nature of the industry, but sometimes major shakeups can be difficult to shake off. There have also been rumblings of another kind of shakeup for Real Racing 3. The App Store is still a tough market to predict when it comes to pricing structure, and it’s rumored that Firemonkeys might do away with the premium price tag for their new racer. In fact, if the rumors are to be believed Real Racing 3 just might be free-to-play. It’s not definite by any stretch of the imagination at this point, but it is possible.

It’s impressive to think that Firemint accomplished all of this–several multi-award winning games, millions upon millions in cumulative sales, and a significant acquisition by a major publisher–in about three years’ time. Where they go from here is anybody’s guess, but with Real Racing 3 looming on the horizon, the future definitely looks exciting, and pretty shiny.

Tomorrow, we’ll delve into the design decisions and what it took to make the premier iOS racing game series, so stay tuned.

Four Player Split Screen Comes To iOS Via Sky Gamblers: Air Supremacy

Posted by on November 16th, 2012
+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad

If you like aerial combat, you probably already have Sky Gamblers: Air Supremacy. If so, then you’ll be able to grab the update today, which brings up to four player multiplayer to the AirPlay option for split screen goodness on the big TV in your living room. The game also has 12 new levels, putting you up against new drones, carriers, and UFOs. How cool is that?

via: Our Review source: You Tube

AirPlay Mirroring is great – in theory. Beaming an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch screen to an Apple TV without having to fuss with cables at all? Wonderful! However, apparently beaming HD video across a wireless network is not easy! For those getting blurry video, or latency so slow that it feels like communicating with the moon would be faster, here’s some tips to make AirPlay Mirroring work far better.

Get close to the router

Rule number one of wireless communication: the closer you are to the wireless source, the better the signal. In this case, video will look a lot better. What may help is to set up a second router near your TV as an access point, using a physical ethernet run to the main router. This may be most easily done via powerline ethernet adapters.

Plug the Apple TV into ethernet

Look, the great thing about wifi is that there’s no cables to fuss with. However, because wifi is essentially sound waves traveling through walls and and other waves, as opposed to beams of concentrated light sent on a direct path like with ethernet, a lot of issues can come up because of this. So, if possible, plug the Apple TV in to the router via ethernet. Performance will get better instantaneously as only one the iOS device will have to be wirelessly communicating to the router.

Upgrade that old router

That old Linksys router with the curious blue front and black body may still work fine for many tasks, but even wireless-G is something of a speed and latency dinosaur. Upgrading to a wireless-N router will find video quality and latency much improved. A dual-band router, one that uses both 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz bands, may find improved performance all around.

Upgrade that old Apple TV

The 2nd generation Apple TV, released in 2010, can decode 720p video sent by AirPlay. Just not very quickly. Upgrading to the newer Apple TV, bolstering an A5 processor, can help. But really, there’s one step for getting high-quality, low-latency AirPlay Mirroring:

Get a Mac.

It’s not an officially-supported feature, but there is a third-party app that can do AirPlay Mirroring on the Mac, called Reflection. It’s $15 with a free trial, and it leverages the powerful processor in a Mac (generally more powerful than the ones in Apple TVs) to provide AirPlay Mirroring at probably the lowest latency possible. I was able to get six-digit scores on Punch Quest, and while some latency is definitely noticeable still, it’s the best possible experience. Just get an HDMI cable and plug that bad boy in to the flatscreen!

AirPlay Mirroring will never be perfect because wireless communication is inherently imperfect, but these tips will make the experience far better!

The Portable Podcast, Episode 147

TV party tonight!

On This Episode:

  • One of the developers of Run for Peace discusses the inspiration behind the endless runner Run for Peace, and the message Game Cooks wanted to send with this game, made in Beirut. As well, he discusses the challenges that come with developing games in a country like Lebanon, without an established development culture.
  • Matthew Braun, the developer of SketchParty TV, talks about what made him make an iPad game designed to be played on TVs.
  • Episode Cast:

  • Host: Carter Dotson
  • Guest: Lebnan Nader, Game Cooks
  • Guest: Matthew Braun, Magnate Interactive
  • Contact The Show: Email | Twitter

    Music:

    How to Listen:

    • Click Here to Subscribe in iTunes:
    • Click Here to Subscribe via RSS.
    • Listen Here:

    Apps Mentioned in this Episode:

    $0.99
    iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
    Released: 2012-07-10 :: Category: Games

    $0.99
    iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
    Released: 2012-06-27 :: Category: Games

    $4.99
    + Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
    Released: 2012-07-20 :: Category: Games

    Exercise workout videos have been around since the days of VHS and, more recently, DVDs. It makes perfect sense that the next evolutionary step is workout videos through an iOS device. Even better, an app that offers AirPlay support so you can see the videos via your AppleTV. That app is FitPlay.

    FitPlay isn’t the cheapest of apps, with in-app purchases priced from $14.99, but it does provide some high quality advice from some of the world’s best coaches. Plenty of different activities are covered here from Kettlebell training to Yoga, Tennis and Soccer. Professional trainers, sportspeople and even Gold Medallists offer advice with tips on how to avoid injury and boost nutrition, as well as their chosen talent.

    For those in need of some video based motivation and advice, FitPlay should be an ideal place for help. The ability to stream the content makes it all the more useful for the home set up.

    FitPlay is out now as an Universal app.

    Get the app here.

    With all of Apple’s relatively recent success in the smartphone and tablet market, we can forget sometimes that what kicked off their modern dominance was a device that simply played music. BICOM, Inc. has been recognizing how important music is to the company with their playGo series of iOS receiver systems. The newest model, the playGo AP1, is their biggest leap forward yet.

    Previous playGo models used USB interfaces but the playGo AP1 instead streams audio wirelessly using Wi-Fi, Ethernet, and Apple’s own AirPlay functionality. Music from iOS devices, iTunes and other services like Pandora, Rhapsody, and Spotify are wirelessly pushed to speakers with their high-fidelity audio intact. The playGO AP1 also retains built in USB for compatibility with older devices.

    Unfortunately, the project is still in need of funding. However, interested buyers can check out the playGo AP1 Kickstarter page and purchase one early for $199. The funding deadline in July 5th and if it’s a success, expect to see the playGo AP1 released shortly thereafter.

    One of Apple’s coolest features, AirPlay, is also one of its least-utilized. Currently, users can easily stream content from their iOS device right to their Apple TV, and the service will be extended in the new OS X Mountain Lion update to allow Macs to do the same. However, there’s never been a way to stream content from an iPhone or iPad to a Mac, until now.

    Reflection offers a simple solution to the problem, simply run the app on your Mac, connect your iOS device to the same wireless network, enable AirPlay and viola, you’re all set. While you still control all of your iOS apps on their native device, you can now display them on your Mac, which should make for some pretty impressive gaming sessions at the very least.

    Reflection will run you $14.99 for a license on a single Mac and $39.99 to install it on up to five separate computers. This being the first version of the app there are still some bugs and crashes, as well as a bit of input lag, but we’re sure that will get tuned up in future updates. In any case, we’re pretty impressed that someone got AirPlay running from iOS to Mac, and in a surprising twist it wasn’t even Apple.

    [via iMore]

    As a companion to the 2012 Swimsuit Edition, Sports Illustrated has officially launched its companion iPhone app. The free version of the app allows access to a selection of photos for each of this year’s models, while those who pay the $6.99 upgrade will get every single photo from this year’s issue as well as exclusive videos, the ability to rotate the photos, and more. Those who already have a subscription to the magazine can grab the premium version of the app for free, all you have to do is punch in your subscription info and the upgrade is yours.

    For those who want to show off to friends, the app also supports Airplay, so if you happen to own an Apple TV you can easily stream all the content directly to your HD television. Furthermore, due to “popular demand,” SI has included pinch-and-zoom capabilities, so you can get up close and personal with all those beautiful… bikinis. What? You’re just checking the labels to see what sort of swimwear to buy your wife, right? Yeah, that’s what we’ll tell her.

    FREE!
    iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
    Released: 2012-02-14 :: Category: Sports

    Exciting times dinosaur fans! Jurassic Park has hit iPad 2s! Not literally obviously as no one would like a T-Rex to crush their beloved gadget. No, I’m talking about Jurassic Park: The Game, hotly anticipated since Telltale Games announced it earlier in the year.

    Maximizing the processing power of the iPad 2, Jurassic Park: The Game promises breath-taking cinematic scenes and some darn impressive graphics. Players will be taken back to Isla Nublar during the events of the first Jurassic Park film and be able to interact with the storyline in a brand new way. While many locations will be familiar to fans, there will also be plenty of new areas to explore as we discussed earlier this week.

    Jurassic Park: The Game also comes with AirPlay functionality so that players can see the action on their Apple TVs for even more impressive visuals.

    Jurassic Park: The Game is out now for the iPad 2 priced at $6.99.

    $2.99
    iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
    Released: 2011-11-15 :: Category: Games

    Another week means another game developer jumping on board the AirPlay support bandwagon. Previously, Firemint and The Binary Mill announced AirPlay functionality, now it’s the turn of Pangea Software’s line up.

    Six of their titles have been updated to provide native support for iOS 5′s AirPlay streaming: Bugdom 2, Cro-Mag Rally, Nanosuar 2, Otto Matic, Quarters, and Enigmo 2. Each title can be played at 1080p with the Apple HDMI adapter or 720p via AirPlay. It’ll work on any iPad 2 or iPhone 4S running iOS5.

    As well as that, Cro-Mag Rally and Nanosaur 2 have had a new ‘Spectator-Cam’ mode added to make the most of AirPlay support. This means an unique view of the game is sent to an HDTV, making it much more entertaining and sociable for others to watch.

    All of the titles have also received a graphical overhaul with new higher resolution artwork implemented to ensure they all look great on HDTVs.

    All of Pangea’s updated apps are available now.

    iCloud Support Added To iWork Apps

    It’s kind of like Christmas for iOS device owners this week. With the huge wealth of new functionality that iOS5 brings, so the numerous app updates flow. In this case, it’s Apple’s flagship iWork applications that have profited from updates that incorporate iCloud functionality.

    Numbers, Pages and Keynote have all been updated to version 1.5 adding the ability to automatically store content in iCloud and thus keep documents up to date across all the user’s iOS devices. As well as that, documents can be downloaded to a PC or Mac at https://www.icloud.com/ as a number of different useful filetypes such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint, Pages ’09, Numbers ’09, Keynote ’09 and PDF format.

    In the case of Pages, voice dictation functionality has also been added to enable users to create and edit documents in iOS5 on their iPhone 4S. Keynote users can benefit from AirPlay support to enable them to show their presentations wirelessly via Apple TV.

    Numerous other minor updates have also been added to the three iWork Apps. Each update is available now.

    $9.99
    + Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
    Released: 2010-04-01 :: Category: Productivity

    $9.99
    + Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
    Released: 2010-04-01 :: Category: Productivity

    $9.99
    + Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
    Released: 2010-04-01 :: Category: Productivity

    Radio Pro Review

    Radio Pro Review

    iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
    Radio Pro is an internet radio app with Dropbox support and Airplay.

    Read The Full Review »

    Jeff already discussed the potential of AirPlay mirroring and it sounds pretty exciting. Now, the idea is becoming reality.

    Consistently revolutionary Real Racing 2 HD, already famed for going 1080P when using an external monitor, has extended this further by offering streaming.

    It’s impressive stuff but come the release of iOS 5 later this year, it’ll be possible to stream Real Racing 2 HD to a big screen TV over AirPlay providing a completely wireless experience. It all sounds wonderfully futuristic being able to transfer the iOS gaming experience to a TV without even needing any wires.

    Real Racing 2 HD already looks gorgeous on the iPad 2 so it’ll no doubt look just as tremendous when it hits the big screen.

    The update should come along around the same time as the release of iOS 5 in the near future.

    Real Racing 2 HD is available now for the iPad priced at $9.99, with iPad 2 owners being able to view it in 1080P via an external monitor and adapter cable.

    $6.99
    iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
    Released: 2011-03-11 :: Category: Games

    Sonos Does AirPlay Their Own Way

    When devices that supported AirPlay started showing up at CES this year it left Sonos at a bit of a disadvantage. Airplay requires special hardware for it to be supported in a consumer device and the Sonos devices didn’t have that chip. But that’s not the end of the story.

    The engineers at Sonos put their heads together to find a way to make AirPlay work on Sonos devices like the S5 which we looked and loved at last year. It’s a bit of software and a bit of hardware. But if you have an Apple AirPort the you have all the hardware you need.

    To make AirPlay work on the Sonos, you connect an AirPort Express directly to your Sonos S5, both the Ethernet and audio cable. Once connected and configured properly, when you play something on the AirPort via AirPlay, the Sonos will pick it up and switch to play the audio from that device automatically. Boom, instant AirPlay.

    Ok, it’s a bit of a kludge, but damn, it works great.

    The Pioneer VSX-1021 is a $549 receiver that works great with an iOS device via AirPlay, Bluetooth, and with a direct connection via the front panel USB port. This really is the iPhone and iPad owners perfect receiver. Not only can you connect via the direct connection and control your music playback via the receiver, you can also stream music from your device via Bluetooth, and AirPlay.

    Pioneer have also created a couple interesting apps that interface with this new receiver. First up, iControlAV2, a universal app. This app lets you throw away the remote and completely control the receiver from your iOS device. Every aspect of the receiver can be controlled. From simple things like switching inputs and the volume, to complex tasks like renaming the inputs and configuring the sound for the room. Take a look at the screenshots below for an idea of the polish of this app.






    Next up is a party app called Air Jam. This app lets up to four iOS devices create and control a playlist assembled from the music on the devices. The music is then streamed to the VSX-1021 via Bluetooth. A couple shots are below.



    Here’s a quick rundown on some of the features that set the VSX-1021 apart from some other receivers and make it a true iOS users dream.

    Partial Pioneer VSX-1021 features:

    - 7.1 Channel
    - Front panel USB port for connection to iPod, iPhone, iPad
    - Playback of audio / video from enabled apps
    - iOS device charging, including iPad
    - AirPlay enabled
    - DLNA enabled
    - Internet Radio with vTuner
    - App Enabled with iControlAV2 and Air Jam apps
    - 5 HDMI inputs

    The Pioneer VSX-1020 should be available later this month at most major retailers and Amazon.

    The long wait is finally over as Apple has officially announced that iOS 4.2 will be available for the iPod, iPhone and iPad today at 10am PST, 1pm EST. The new update brings features such as folders, multitasking and a unified inbox to the iPad, as well as AirPlay and AirPrint to all devices. For a full rundown of all the new features make sure to check out the tutorials we posted last week.

    Specifically in relation to the iPad, Apple head honcho Steve Jobs said “iOS 4.2 makes the iPad a completely new product, just in time for the holiday season. Once again, the iPad with iOS 4.2 will define the target that other tablets will aspire to, but very few, if any, will ever be able to hit.”

    One of the less publicized but still incredibly important features is the fact that Apple is extending the Find My Phone service to all users for free. The feature, which allows users to track down lost iOS devices remotely, was previously restricted to MobileMe subscribers. The feature is great for those afraid of losing their device and having sensitive data exposed to the world, as Find My Phone allows you to locate your device on a map, lock it remotely and even wipe data if it’s been compromised. Granted, most of us don’t really need such a service, but it still makes our lives feel just a little more like a James Bond film, and that’s always awesome.

    At any rate, we’re mere hours away from Apple’s next big major operating system update! How excited are you? Are you planning a party to have all your friends come over and you’ll all eat snacks and download the update together? We’ll bring the dip, but if Susan makes that awful casserole again we’re totally leaving right away and will just keep running 4.1 until we get home.

    FREE!
    + Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
    Released: 2010-06-18 :: Category: Utilities

    [via MacRumors and Apple]

    Though most of us poor schmucks continue to wait around for Apple to release iOS 4.2 there are some media types who have had access to the update for a while now and have spent some quality time with the new tech. Thankfully, our friends over at TiPb have gone ahead and created a couple of videos to walk us through the new features that 4.2 will bring to the iPad and iPhone.

    The iPad video goes in depth on a lot of new features, including AirPlay integration and multitasking. We’re also happy that TiPb dove into the back-end a bit, showing off the new settings and other under the hood changes you might not have noticed had they not been featured in the video. Of course the iPad is also getting a few enhancements that have been on the iPhone for a while now, including Game Center and organizing apps into folders. While Apple’s folder system isn’t the most elegant solution in the world, it’s still very space-saving and helpful to those who thrive on organizing their life.

    The iPhone video is a bit shorter as iOS 4.2 is not quite as weighty of a change for Apple’s smaller device. Some major inclusions are the introduction of MobileMe, as well as how to get to the volume and AirPlay controls via swiping the multitasking dock. There’s also mention of AirPrint, though it is rumored this feature may be dropped or altered before iOS 4.2 actually launches. There are also a number of other small changes and improvements you may not have known about before.

    So feel free to point your peepers at the video for your relevant iOS device(s) and prepare to amaze your friends when you’re navigating the new system like a pro on launch day while they’re still trying to figure out how to adjust screen brightness. For at least a brief time you can feel completely confident in the fact that you are better than them.

    [via TiPb]

    Get ready for the mandatory update message next time you turn on iTunes as Apple has released version 10.1 into the wild. This isn’t your garden-variety new version though, as iTunes 10.1 introduces support for iOS 4.2 and some of its sexy new features.

    Perhaps the most exciting aspect of iTunes 10.1 is the fact that it includes AirPlay support, which is kind of a big deal. Now users will be able to download and start a movie or TV show in iTunes on and then push it over to their Apple TV via AirPlay. Of course this is contingent upon actually having Apple TV, but for those that do it’s a great way to watch your video content without messy cables or extra time hooking stuff up.

    AirPlay support landing in iTunes also pushes web-based video content one step closer towards killing traditional cable and satellite television models. As popular shows and movies appear online with generally lower prices than standard cable and satellite packages more and more folks are thinking about “cutting the cable” and moving to purely web-based consumption. What’s held them back until now has been the issue of trickier tech for non-savvy folks, but when you can start a show on your computer or iOS device and then instantly send it to your TV that takes out a lot of the fear. Granted, there are still some other issues to work out such as the amount of content available and general questions about reliability, but you have to walk before you can run.

    iTunes 10.1 is available now and will likely show up next time you boot up iTunes or your computer does a sweep for new Apple-related software. If you absolutely can’t wait any longer you can also head over to the iTunes page and download it from there. Also take heart that this likely means iOS 4.2 should be just about ready for launch, but then we’ve been holding our breath so long we’re about to turn blue.

    [via EndGadget]

    The 4.2 update for iOS devices is rumored to be launching this week, and perhaps no machine is getting more fun new features than the iPad. While many of the additions merely bring the iPad in line with capabilities already possessed by the iPhone and iPod Touch, no one seems to be complaining. Here’s a quick rundown of what’s coming in the update.

    AirPlay – Owners will now be able to stream their pictures, videos and music directly from their iPad to their Apple TVs and AirPort Express, as well as to other AirPlay-compatible devices from third-party vendors.

    AirPrint: With AirPrint you’ll now be able to wirelessly print from your iPad by allowing iOS 4.2 devices to discover printers on the local network. The only catch is you seem to need the newest version of Snow Leopard to make it work.

    Multitasking: Possibly the biggest new feature in iOS 4.2 is multitasking. Just like on the iPhone and iPod touch, a double click on the home button brings up a bar at the bottom of the screen with the last six apps opened. This allows users to switch between apps without having to go to the home screen first.

    Folders: iPad users can now finally organize their apps into folders, with up to 20 apps in each folder.

    Game Center: Now you can track Achievements and friends on any iOS device and brag about your amazing score regardless of what mobile device you’re carrying. The app is pretty much the same as what’s already available on other iOS machines.

    Also just like on the iPhone, swiping to the right on the multitasking panel brings up screen brightness and volume. Apple turned the orientation toggle on the top right of the device into a mute switch, so this area of the multitasking bar now lets you lock your iPad into the desired orientation.

    Safari: The ‘+’ button for bookmarking sites is gone and has been replaced with a share button that includes the bookmarking functionality, but also allows you to compose an email with a link to the current page and to print the page with the help of AirPrint. The tab button now also shows how many open tabs you currently have.

    Also new is the ability to search for text inside a page. The search feature in Safari now doesn’t just display search suggestions but also tells you how often your search terms appear on the page you are currently looking at. After clicking on one of these results, a new bar appears at the bottom of the browser screen that allows you to jump to all the instances of this keyword and also to refine your search.

    Unified Email Inbox: See all your email in one inbox, even if you sync multiple email accounts with your iPad. Gmail accounts can also archive messages rather than deleting them, but if you do want to delete a message it requires going through a couple extra menu screens in order to do so.

    So plenty of new toys available for iPad users to check out, now we just have to wait for Apple to throw the switch and make the update live. Once 4.2 is in the wild we will be sure and let you know so you can download it immediately.

    [via ReadWriteWeb]
    [inbox image source: TiPb]

        Advertisement    





    Featured Apps

        Advertisement    


    Categories

    Developers

    Would you like your application reviewed on 148Apps? See the About page for information.
        Advertisement    



    Steel Media Network

    148Apps - iPhone app reviews and news. The best gosh darn iPhone app site this side of Mars.
    http://148apps.com :: @148Apps

    Android Rundown - Android news and reviews. Where you get the rundown on Android apps and hardware.
    http://AndroidRundown.com :: @AndroidRundown

    Best App Ever - Yearly Mobile App Achievement Awards.
    http://bestappever.com :: @BestAppEver

    Pocket Gamer - Mobile game reviews, news, and features.
    http://PocketGamer.co.uk :: @PocketGamer

    Pocket Gamer.biz - Mobile games industry news, opinion, and analysis.
    http://PocketGamer.biz :: @pgbiz

    AppSpy - iOS game news and video reviews.
    http://appspy.com :: @appspy