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Jordan Minor

Senior Writer with the 148Apps Network since August 19, 2011

Wordsmith. Northwestern Alum. Fan of video games. Fascinated with the internet.

Connect with Jordan via:
Twitter: @JordanWMinor
Email :: jordan.minor@148apps.com
Personal site :: http://www.JordansOB.blogspot.com
Bricks Review

Bricks Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
This twisted take on Breakout deftly avoids being too minimal for its own good.

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Globber’s Escape Review

Globber’s Escape Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Its inspirations are obvious, but Globber's Escape's frantic arcade gameplay still delivers.

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BladeSmith Review

BladeSmith Review

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
BladeSmith's sharp ideas are dulled by borderline incomprehensible presentation.

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Minimo Review

Minimo Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Is there room for one more Flappy Bird clone?

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Pi-Pi-Ee Review

Pi-Pi-Ee Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Pi-Pi-Ee successfully balances simple rules with strategic depth.

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ViCTOR: Virus Eradicator Review

ViCTOR: Virus Eradicator Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
This game needs a check-up of its own.

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Stickman Soccer 2014 Review

Stickman Soccer 2014 Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Stickman Soccer 2014 is a good but plain take on the beautiful game.

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Who Wore it Best? goes searching for a fresh spin on the match-3 puzzle game and two challengers emerge: Spin It and Perplexity. But who prevails?

Phantom Flower Review

Phantom Flower Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Classy art direction can't hide Phantom Flower's fun but fleeting gameplay.

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Outernauts: Monster Battle Review

Outernauts: Monster Battle Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
A harmonious mix of F2P features lead Outernaut's simple monster battling to victory.

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Delivery Outlaw Review

Delivery Outlaw Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Adult Swim's physics trial racer is good, but mostly wheel-spinning.

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Ruzzle Adventure Review

Ruzzle Adventure Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
This ambitious puzzle game sequel is a ruzzingly good time.

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Galaxy Defense Force Review

Galaxy Defense Force Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Galaxy Defense Force's unique shoot 'em up style runs circles around the competition.

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Mad Road Driver Review

Mad Road Driver Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
No one can out run the post-apocalypse, but it sure is fun to try.

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Ripple Munch Review

Ripple Munch Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Ripple Munch is middle of the road, middle of the food chain.

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RYO Review

RYO Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
RYO's simple puzzles create a rainbow of complex colors.

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It Came From Canada: Godus

After messing around with giant cubes and social experiments, the famously eccentric game designer Peter Molyneux returns to the God game genre with Godus. This spiritual successor to Molyneux’s earlier game, Populous, is currently in beta on PC and has just soft launched on the New Zealand App Store. We let absolute power corrupt us absolutely in this edition of It Came From Canada!

Witness and shape the beginning of human history in Godus. As a benevolent deity, players will guide their followers from a single hut on a beach at the dawn of time up until around the Roman Empire, although the game could certainly continue from there. The main way to achieve this is by molding the Earth and allowing the population to expand. It’s almost sad mowing down thick forests to let humanity proliferate like a virus, but such is life. There don’t seem to be any threats to the tiny citizens, like predators or natural disasters, so players can just focus on reproduction. As the population grows, the player’s godly power increases – granting them new skills like the ability to shift oceans or terraform more parts of the single, continuous map.

godus 1The game unsurprisingly has numerous subsystems as well. More intense god powers, including burning bushes or controlling followers directly through “leashing,” draw from the belief of worshippers. Players naturally gain belief as their small world grows, but it can be purchased using the game’s real-money gem system as well. Players can also purchase sticker packs to activate the special cards they receive with each level up. These cards bestow various bonuses like faster building speeds or the ability to start settlements on different terrain. Fortunately, stickers appear naturally in the world too.

As more of the cold, unconquered North gives way to the player’s bright civilization, players will encounter ships and beacons allowing them to interact with other players online. In fact, the grand prize for finishing 22Can’s previous game Curiosity was becoming the God of Gods in Godus, along with a share of the profits. However, in many ways the game works best as an isolated experience, an entire little world unto itself.

godus 2That shoebox diorama quality is accentuated by the game’s almost paper cut-out art style. The solid colors and obvious layers of the landscape may not be realistic, but they’re charming. The same goes for the cute sound effects like the mysterious voices on the wind and the happy little tunes villagers whistle while they work. The distinct layers also make it easier for players to meticulously sculpt the land as they see fit. They can even make terraced steps out of the Earth for followers to climb to higher places, when their spotty path finding works that is. However, it is still a little too easy for fatter fingers to make unintended changes, which is especially annoying when those accidental changes waste precious belief.

Still, Godus successfully captures both the tedium and the power trip of what being an all-knowing, all-powerful force must feel like. Players can get their hands on a world of their own when the game fully launches.

It’s archery-filled madness on Who Wore it Best? as The Legend of the Holy Archer and World of Gibbets both aim for the bullseye.

Simply Twisted Review

Simply Twisted Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Despite its painful lack of style, Simply Twisted's loopy puzzles deliver.

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In an App Store chock full of shameless clones, it’s always nice to see a game that expands on its influences instead of just copying them wholesale. Such is the case with Globber’s Escape, now in a soft launch phase, which clearly borrows its basic framework from the classic Pac-Man formula. But fortunately it doesn’t stop there, and we see just how far it goes in this edition of It Came From Canada!

In Globber’s Escape, players guide a circular creature around a 2D maze collecting tiny objects and avoiding patrolling enemies. However, if they collect the right power-up they can turn the tables on their foes and gobble them up, sending baddies back to the center to regenerate. Again, it sounds like Pac-Man. But from that familiar set-up, the game starts diverging in small but clever ways.

globber's escape 1globber's escape 2Instead of static dots, players devour little aliens that sporadically burst out of different containers on the map and mindlessly roam around the stage. This means players must always be ready to adjust their paths and strategies on the fly. Once all the critters are collected, instead of automatically starting the next round players must manually escape the room by reaching the closest open door. However, this makes them even more vulnerable to agitated enemies like evil mad scientists and almost unfairly unstoppable robots. If players do get caught, they can free Globber using the rare revive hammers sprinkled throughout each map. And when it’s game over for real, the final score goes towards increasing Globber’s level.

In an alternate universe, Globber’s Escape is one of the better arcade games made to capitalize on Pac-Man‘s success. Along with all the mechanical twists, the game has a less breakneck and more strategic pace overall. The control scheme has players creating waypoints for Globber to follow by touching the maze, which reduces the amount of mindless, frantic tapping while still allowing players to course correct easily.

globber's escape 3globber's escape 4However, for all of its gameplay creativity, Globber’s Escape‘s presentation sadly falls back on generic tropes. The cartoony sci-fi visuals, full of vibrant colors and angular designs, are pleasant but uninspired. The music might as well be non-existent. Some of the dialogue between the chatty tutorial robots is at least kind of amusing in a classic comedy duo way, but the game’s universe isn’t the reason to get invested.

Instead, players should get invested because Globber’s Escape is reassuring proof that cool, new games can still come from slight tweaks to old concepts once considered done to death. They can find out for themselves though when the game launches worldwide soon.

Paperchase Review

Paperchase Review

iPhone App - Designed for the iPhone, compatible with the iPad
Like a piece of parchment, Paperchase is beautiful but thin.

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Swipecart Review

Swipecart Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Swipecart is rickety, but never quite falls off the rails.

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It Came From Canada: Retry

Retry, the latest game from the Angry Birds moguls at Rovio, apparently comes from the publisher’s new educational gaming branch. But if that’s the case, the only thing this game teaches is that life is nothing but unending punishment. Prepare for high-flying death over and over again in the latest edition of It Came From Canada!

Retry takes the brutally difficult flight controls of the infamous Flappy Bird but has players navigating finite, designed levels instead of endless rows of pipes. Pressing the screen boosts the player’s plane forward and also aims it up slightly. Meanwhile, letting go causes the plane to fall. With limited control over their speed and trajectory, players have to rely on careful yet confident taps to make it through these death traps. One brush against the environment, aside from water or wind currents, equals instant death. Sometimes the only way forward is a well-timed and skillfully executed loop-de-loop. The name Retry itself refers to how often players will be restarting the game. They’re even forced to look at the ghosts of their past selves, crashed against the walls, as their trial-and-error toils on.

retry 1There are a few oases in their desert however. Each level has a handful of permanent checkpoints, but in a devastating twist, they can only be activated if the player has a coin. Most sections between checkpoints have a coin somewhere in them, but they are usually in tough to reach spots – making the game even harder. If players can’t manage that, which is truly understandable, they can also just pay for coins. They can even earn them outside of gameplay by completing easy achievements like crashing a bunch. Overall, the checkpoint system is an intriguing compromise between being fair to the player while still honoring the game’s core commitment to hair-pulling challenge levels.

retry 5Sadism isn’t the only thing Retry shares with Flappy Bird. Both games use a chunky, pastel, pixelated art style and peppy music that belie their dark hearts and cruel, true natures. Retry has four worlds with various visual themes like “summer” and “the future.” Expect to see the same skies often though, because while the game has a decent amount of different levels, its difficulty and frequent restarts inevitably lead to repetition. Fortunately, that also means it will be a long time before players experience all the game has to offer.

Retry is currently in a soft launch phase, but once Rovio finishes toying with the Canadians, expect them to unleash their torture on the rest of the world soon enough. With the amount of effort this takes, it’s probably easier to just learn how to fly a real plane.

And Then it Rained Review

And Then it Rained Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Peace and tranquility flow through this puzzler like water.

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Who Wore it Best? takes on its most puzzlingly high-profile case of cloning yet again with Threes! vs. 2048.

Hazumino Review

Hazumino Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Hazumino skillfully combines endless running with endless block stacking.

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Scoop Review

Scoop Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Scoop's arcade action relies too much on random luck than quick skills.

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PixelMogul Review

PixelMogul Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
PixelMogul isn't the most exciting tenant, but it pays its rent on time.

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Bonsai Slice Review

Bonsai Slice Review

iPad Only App - Designed for the iPad
Bonsai Slice brings samurai fantasies to life with augmented-reality swordplay.

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Spin It Review

Spin It Review

+ Universal App - Designed for iPhone and iPad
Spin It has a fine puzzle game model, but its execution lacks energy.

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